gluten-free gluten-free

Lots of families fight over politics at the holiday table. But decisions about which foods to put on the table can whip up stress and squabbles, too. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

It's Not Just Politics. Food Can Stir Holiday Conflict, Too

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For people with celiac disease gluten-free food is a must. A new study suggests that a common virus may trigger the onset of the disease. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says there is not enough evidence to determine whether testing people with no symptoms of celiac disease provides any benefit for those patients. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

No Need To Get Screened For Celiac Unless You Have Symptoms, Panel Says

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An FDA rule effective Aug. 5 states that foods may be labeled "gluten free" only if there's less than 20 parts per million of the protein. James Benet/iStockphoto hide caption

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James Benet/iStockphoto

Truth In Labeling: Celiac Community Cheers FDA Rule For Gluten Free

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About 40 years ago wheat breeders introduced new varieties of wheat that helped farmers increase their grain yields. But scientists say those varieties aren't linked to the rise in celiac disease. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Doctors Say Changes In Wheat Do Not Explain Rise Of Celiac Disease

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More and more gluten-free beers are entering the marketplace. We asked a librarian with celiac disease for her list of favorites. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

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Bill Chappell/NPR