fertility fertility

A 36-year-old woman who had her DNA tested by Ancestry.com says she was shocked to learn that her biological father was her parents' fertility doctor. Jose A. Bernat Bacete/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose A. Bernat Bacete/Getty Images

Positive pregnancy tests can also be a positive indicator for the future of the economy, according to new research published by The National Bureau of Economic Research. SKXE/Flickr hide caption

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SKXE/Flickr

In both urban and rural areas, about 40 percent of women surveyed were currently married to a member of the opposite sex. Only about 30 percent of the rural women of childbearing age had no children, versus roughly 41 percent of urban women. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

An international team of scientists analyzed data from men around the world and found sperm counts declining in Western countries. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Sperm Counts Plummet In Western Men, Study Finds

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The Natural Cycles app was designed by a particle physicist and launched in 2014. It's now been certified as a method of birth control in the E.U. Courtesy of Natural Cycles hide caption

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Courtesy of Natural Cycles

Mobile App Designed To Prevent Pregnancy Gets EU Approval

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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Getty Images

New York Fertility Doctor Says He Created Baby With 3 Genetic Parents

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Women Find A Fertility Test Isn't As Reliable As They'd Like

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Eggs may be more vulnerable to freezing than embryos, but that's just one factor that affects the odds of having a baby with frozen eggs. Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source hide caption

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Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source

Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program. Eric Mennel/WUNC hide caption

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Eric Mennel/WUNC

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

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A technician opens a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells in April 2011 in Amsterdam. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Silicon Valley Companies Add New Benefit For Women: Egg-Freezing

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A doctor uses a microscrope to view a human egg during in vitro fertilization (IVF), which is used to fertilize eggs that have been frozen. Mauro Fermariello/ScienceSource hide caption

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Mauro Fermariello/ScienceSource

Women Can Freeze Their Eggs For The Future, But At A Cost

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