Southern food Southern food

Lashkari gives us a tour of his kitchen. He's known for some of the best Pakistani and Indian food in Houston. His cooking borrows happily from other cultures. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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Peter Breslow/NPR

A Visit To Houston's Himalaya: Pakistani And Indian Food With Deep Texas Roots

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A machine coined "The Enrober" provides the "Willy Wonka moment" of MoonPie-making, when the treats are propelled under a gooey chocolate waterfall. Melanie Peeples for NPR hide caption

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Melanie Peeples for NPR

Even After 100 Years, People Are Still Reaching For The Moon(Pie)

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A vintage postcard from the Peach Tree State. Georgia isn't the biggest producer of the pink-orange fruit. So why are its peaches so iconic? The answer has a lot to do with slavery — its end and a need for the South to rebrand itself. Found Image Holdings Inc/Getty Images hide caption

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Found Image Holdings Inc/Getty Images

This upland rice is a remarkable link between West Africa, the Gullah-Geechee sea islands of the American South, and the Merikin settlements of southern Trinidad. Courtesy of Francis Morean hide caption

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Courtesy of Francis Morean

Vishwesh Bhatt is the executive chef of Snackbar, a restaurant in Oxford, Miss. And he's winning acclaim as one of the region's best chefs for Indian-inflected Southern fare that reflects a changing South. Danny Klimetz for NPR hide caption

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Danny Klimetz for NPR

Mississippi Masala: How A Native Of India Became A Southern Cooking Star

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African runner peanuts were once a defining flavor of the South, memorialized in songs, peanut fritters, peanut soup and in Charleston's signature candy, the peanut-and-molasses groundnut cake. But by the 1930s the nuts had all but disappeared. Courtesy of Brian Ward hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Ward

Lexington Style BBQ Pork Sandwich, Slaw, Pickled Okra. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

African-American Museum Cafe Serves Up Black History With Every Forkful

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Phila Hach (standing, center) and her husband, Adolf Hach, are seen here with Minnie Pearl (right) of Grand Ole Opry fame, and an unidentified woman. "What the Grand Ole Opry did for country music, she has done for Southern food," one food writer wrote about Hach. Courtesy of the Hach Family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Hach Family

Phila Hach, Who Spread The Gospel Of Southern Cuisine, Dies At 89

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Waiter carriers pass food to passengers on a train stopping in Gordonsville, Va., in this undated photo. After the Civil War, local African-American women found a route to financial freedom by selling their famous fried chicken and other home-made goods track-side. Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville hide caption

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Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville

An African-American Army cook at work in City Point, Va., sometime between 1860 and 1865. Food played a critical role in determining the outcome of the Civil War. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

The salty suspects: Some 70 percent of the cheeses, soups, cold cuts and pizzas we buy at the grocery store exceed the Food and Drug Administration's "healthy" labeling standards for salt. Since we eat so much bread, it is — perhaps surprisingly — the top contributor of sodium to our diets. iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr hide caption

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iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr

Eat, Drink And Be Scholarly: The Southern Food and Beverage Museum's new, permanent home in New Orleans is designed to help answer many questions — including "How does it taste?" Stephen Binns/Courtesy of SoFAB hide caption

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Stephen Binns/Courtesy of SoFAB

Instead of throwing out the nutritious broth that's left over when you cook down greens, why not use it as the base for a delicious dish like this rockfish with clams in a garlic-shallot pot liquor sauce? Alison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Alison Aubrey/NPR