Silicon Valley Silicon Valley

Jessica Alter is a co-founder of Tech For Campaigns. The San Francisco-based startup focuses on state races and is currently working on campaigns in Virginia. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Silicon Valley Wants To Dust Off The Democratic Establishment

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Freada Kapor Klein stands on a staircase at the Kapor Center for Social Impact in Oakland, Calif. She is a high profile investor, who invested early on with Uber. She has used her voice and her money in a decades-long effort to promote more diversity in Silicon Valley. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

The Investor Who Took On Uber, And Silicon Valley

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Inventor Thomas Edison stands in his chemistry lab in West Orange, N.J., in 1904. Thomas Edison National Historical Park/National Park Service hide caption

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Thomas Edison National Historical Park/National Park Service

Before Silicon Valley, New Jersey Reigned As Nation's Center Of Innovation

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: The World's Worst Video Game

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Tom Hanks stars in The Circle as a tech CEO who is part Steve Jobs and part Mark Zuckerberg. Frank Masi/STX Entertainment hide caption

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Frank Masi/STX Entertainment

In 'The Circle', What We Give Up When We Share Ourselves

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Starsky Robotics is retrofitting large trucks to make them driverless. The startup hopes that by the end of the year, it will be able to operate a truck without a person physically sitting in the vehicle. Courtesy of Starsky Robotics hide caption

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Courtesy of Starsky Robotics

Students at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The historically black university is opening Howard West at Google's headquarters in Mountain View. Howard University hide caption

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Howard University

Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

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A group of people walk on Castro Street, in the downtown portion of the Silicon Valley town of Mountain View, California, August 24, 2016. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images). Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

A guard stands outside the Survival Condo Project, the site of an underground luxury apartment complex north of Wichita, Kan. Dan Winters/The New Yorker hide caption

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Dan Winters/The New Yorker

Why Some Silicon Valley Tech Executives Are Bunkering Down For Doomsday

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Are you feeling stuck? Scroll down to take our quiz and find out whether you have a "gravity" problem. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

How Silicon Valley Can Help You Get Unstuck

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Why Aren't There More Women In Tech? A Tour Of Silicon Valley's Leaky Pipeline

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks with technology leaders at Trump Tower in New York. Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Trump And Technology Executives Try To Reconcile Rough Relationship

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In a speech on Capitol Hill honoring outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Thursday, Hillary Clinton warned of the dangers of fake news. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Aaron Levie, CEO of Box, supported Hillary Clinton and he says he will continue to work and lobby for what he believes. Lisa Lake/Getty Images hide caption

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Lisa Lake/Getty Images

Tech Leaders Vow To Resist Trump, But They Also Hope To Find Common Ground

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While much of Silicon Valley has supported Hillary Clinton, billionaire investor Peter Thiel is backing Donald Trump. "We're voting for Trump because we judge the leadership of our country to have failed," Thiel says. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Peter Thiel Stands Out In Silicon Valley For Support Of Donald Trump

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Steven Vachani is in a protracted legal battle with Facebook. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

The Man Who Stood Up To Facebook

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Customers use interactive kiosks to place orders at Eatsa, a fully automated fast food restaurant in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

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Anti-Defamation League Steps Up Efforts To Combat Anti-Semitism Online

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Yahoo President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote during the Yahoo Mobile Developers Conference on Feb. 18, in San Francisco. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Getty Images

Is There A Double Standard When Female CEOs In Tech Stumble?

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