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enterovirus

Evan Mazanec came down with AFM when he was 7, in 2014. It started with a fever and an ear infection, and lead to paralysis. He has since made a full recovery — he's back to playing baseball and living a full life. Alex Gort/Gort Productions hide caption

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Alex Gort/Gort Productions

Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., was the first to report a surge of children with serious respiratory illness in August. Andy Pollard/Children's Mercy Kansas City hide caption

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Andy Pollard/Children's Mercy Kansas City

Sofia Jarvis, seen here with her family at a press conference in February, is one of several dozen children in California who have been diagnosed with a rare paralytic syndrome. It has left her left arm paralyzed. Martha Mendoza/AP hide caption

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Martha Mendoza/AP

PCR tests like this can tell if a virus is an enterovirus, but they can't ID the new virus that has caused a surge in serious respiratory infections. BSIP / Science Source hide caption

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BSIP / Science Source

13-year-old Will Cornejo of Lone Tree, Colo., recovers at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in Denver from what doctors suspect is enterovirus 68. His parents found him unconscious on the couch and called 911. He was flown to Denver for treatment. Cyrus McCrimmon/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyrus McCrimmon/Denver Post/Getty Images

Sophia Jarvis, 4, of Berkeley, Calif., is one of the few children diagnosed with the polio-like disease, which left her arm paralyzed. She attended a press conference Monday at Stanford University with her dad, Jeff. Martha Mendoza/AP hide caption

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Martha Mendoza/AP

Cambodian children and their parents sitting at Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh on July 5. Khem Sovannara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khem Sovannara/AFP/Getty Images