climate climate

Snow-making has been called a Band-Aid to the bigger problem of warming temperatures. Patrik Duda / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Patrik Duda / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Snow-Making For Skiing During Warm Winters Comes With Environmental Cost

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President Donald Trump shakes hands with EPA chief Scott Pruitt on June 1 after speaking about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

A refinery in Anacortes, Wash. In 2016, voters in Washington state rejected an initiative that would have taxed carbon emissions from fossil fuels such as coal and gasoline. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Participants at the Marrakech climate conference stage a public show of support for climate negotiations and the Paris agreement on Friday. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP

As Marrakech Climate Talks End, Worries Remain About U.S. Pullout

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Agustin Mayta Condori shows a sick alpaca, which he predicted would die the next day because of subfreezing temperatures in the southern Andes in Peru. Thousands of alpacas have died in the region. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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NOAA/Flickr

Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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French Foreign Minister and President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius (center) gives a thumbs up while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and French President Francois Hollande applaud after the final meeting of the U.N. conference on climate change in Le Bourget, France, on Saturday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

Ousmane Ndiaye loves computer models, climate forecasting and babies. Here he holds farmer Mariami Keita's 4-month-old baby girl, Ndeye. Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS) hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS)