plastics plastics

As awareness grows about the environmental toll of single-use plastics, retailers and regulators alike are finding ways to decrease their use. And straws have become a prime target. Barbara Woike/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Barbara Woike/AP

Last Straw For Plastic Straws? Cities, Restaurants Move To Toss These Sippers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615580695/616104559" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A prep cook at a San Francisco restaurant drops fish skin into a food scrap recycling container. Turning food waste into fertilizer is popular in parts of Europe and is catching on in the U.S. But tiny plastics are also making their way into that fertilizer — and into the food chain. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Another Place Plastics Are Turning Up: Organic Fertilizer From Food Waste

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/600174922/600288280" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

toggle caption
Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

The larvae of Galleria mellonella, commonly known as a wax worm, is able to biodegrade plastic bags. Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab hide caption

toggle caption
Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

The Lowly Wax Worm May Hold The Key To Biodegrading Plastic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525447206/525604837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A fisherman collects water on a beach littered with trash at an ecological reserve south of Manila in 2013. Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov

8 Million Tons Of Plastic Clutter Our Seas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/385752248/385794002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"A lot of people are eating seafood all the time, and fish are eating plastic all the time, so I think that's a problem," says a marine toxicologist. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

PlastiPure helps manufacturers create water bottles and other plastic products that have no estrogenic activity. PlastiPure hide caption

toggle caption
PlastiPure

BPA-Free Plastics Going On Trial In Texas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/201523240/202247785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript