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American food culture

A woman shopping in the 1970s picks up a bag of Snyder's pretzels. Today, Hanover remains a center of snack food manufacturing, even as the food industry changes around it. Courtesy of Snyder's of Hanover hide caption

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Courtesy of Snyder's of Hanover

A bowl of creamy cheese grits. Food writer Erin Byers Murray hopes that exploring the story of grits will help spur more discussion about how food shapes our culture, as humble ingredients are elevated into expensive dishes even as we come to terms with long-lost, or ignored, origin stories that deserve recognition. Lauri Patterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

Lunch clubs are becoming a popular trend in offices as a way for co-workers to brighten each other's days by sharing meals they've prepared for one another. They might eat together or at their own separate desks. Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons

Would you eat a cricket? Parth Shah hide caption

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Parth Shah

Yum and Yuck: The Psychology Of What We Eat...And What We Spit Out

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Hungry, Hungry Hippocampus: Why and How We Eat

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A machine coined "The Enrober" provides the "Willy Wonka moment" of MoonPie-making, when the treats are propelled under a gooey chocolate waterfall. Melanie Peeples for NPR hide caption

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Melanie Peeples for NPR

Even After 100 Years, People Are Still Reaching For The Moon(Pie)

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Grabbing turkey legs to gnaw on might be taboo at some tables and encouraged at others. But whatever your Thanksgiving traditions, they're all yours. Evans/Getty Images hide caption

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Evans/Getty Images

Though the filling is not actually totally transparent, the name of the pie has stuck around since it first appeared in Kentucky newspapers in the 1890s. J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL hide caption

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J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL

One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Twitty

Lillie Pete sifts the juniper ash before adding it to her blue corn mush. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

To Get Calcium, Navajos Burn Juniper Branches To Eat The Ash

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Author Michael Ruhlman says U.S. grocery stores represent extraordinary luxury that most Americans don't even think about. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

Grocery Stores: 'The Best Of America And The Worst Of America'

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In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU