gonorrhea gonorrhea

Mary Horman (left), a registered nurse for Clackamas County, and Liz Baca, a disease intervention specialist for the county, search for the right address in an Oregon neighborhood. Part of their job is to get information to people who may have a serious, treatable infection, yet not realize it. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Discreetly Tracking Down Sex Partners To Stop A Surge In STDs

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A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

A billboard above a gas station reads "Feel The Burn," a play on 2016 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' campaign slogan, "Feel The Bern." It's actually promoting tests for sexually transmitted diseases. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP
Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR

So, You Have Gonorrhea. Who Tells Your Ex?

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A public health poster from 1952 encourages Americans to get checked for sexually transmitted diseases. Gonorrhea is the second-most-common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 300,000 cases reported in 2011. Images from the History of Medicine hide caption

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Images from the History of Medicine

In the U.S., doctors no longer have the option of treating gonorrhea with a pill. Instead, they are advised to use an injectable antibiotic, which is still effective against the bacteria. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

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