Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Starting this week, there are two people appointed to the job of acting director of the CFPB, and it's unclear who will get to stay. Mick Mulvaney, President Trump's current budget director and pick for the position, has gone on the record supporting the elimination of the bureau, which would make it easier for loan services to take advantage of borrowers. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Mick Mulvaney, director of the Office of Management and Budget, was on Friday named acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau by President Trump. But before resigning earlier in the day, CFPB Director Richard Cordray had named Leandra English to be his interim successor. Astrid Riecken/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/Getty Images

Richard Cordray, who was appointed by President Barack Obama, is stepping down as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, testifies before a Senate committee last year. The Trump administration is trying to bring the independent bureau under the president's direct control. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo. Stumpf testifies today before the Senate Banking Committee about his bank employees opening unauthorized customer accounts. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Regulators announced Thursday that Wells Fargo is being fined $185 million to settle allegations that it secretly opened unauthorized accounts for customers in order to meet sales goals. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP
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'Mystery Shoppers' Help U.S. Regulators Fight Racial Discrimination At Banks

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The problems with the Russell Simmons' financial company, RushCard, started Oct.12, when a software upgrade in the transaction processing system caused many accounts to show a zero balance or left customers unable to access to their funds. Rob Latour/Rob Latour/Invision/AP hide caption

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Rob Latour/Rob Latour/Invision/AP

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray, center, participates in a panel discussion in March. His agency is considering banning financial companies from routinely requiring consumers to sign away the right to sue. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Ron Sachs/pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Sachs/pool/Getty Images

'We're Here To Stay' Says Newly Confirmed Consumer Watchdog

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