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Emily Blair, a medical assistant at the Colon, Stomach and Liver Center in Lansdowne, Va., takes a blood pressure reading for Robert Koenen. New guidelines say that patients should have their arm resting on a surface while taking a reading and both feet should be placed flat on the ground. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Josh Loock/NPR

Odds Are, They're Taking Your Blood Pressure All Wrong

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With Stricter Guidelines, Do You Have High Blood Pressure Now?

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Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Clare Kelley practices "forest bathing" along the edge of an urban forest on Roosevelt Island, in the middle of the Potomac River. In contrast to hiking, forest bathing is less directed, melding mindfulness and nature immersion to improve health. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Forest Bathing: A Retreat To Nature Can Boost Immunity And Mood

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Knowing Someone Who Faced Discrimination May Affect Blood Pressure

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Troy Hodge was only 41 years old when a vessel in his brain burst. "You don't think of things you can't do until you can't do them," he says. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Strokes On The Rise Among Younger Adults

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That black triangle icon is a sodium warning label next to a dish on the menu at an Applebee's in New York City. Starting Tuesday, the city's Health Department is requiring chain restaurants with 15 or more locations to display the salt shaker icon next to menu items containing 2,300 mg or more of sodium — the recommended daily limit. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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High-Sodium Warnings Hit New York City Menus

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A landmark federal study was halted when early results showed that lowering patients' top blood pressure number to 120 or lower led to dramatic reductions in heart disease and deaths. iStockphoto hide caption

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Aggressively Lowering Blood Pressure Saves Lives, Study Finds

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For all the good aspirin can do in preventing second heart attacks and strokes, taking it daily can boost some risks, too — of ulcers, for example, and of bleeding in the brain or gut. iStockphoto hide caption

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Maybe You Should Rethink That Daily Aspirin

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A third of Americans have high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Half of them don't have it under control. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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