memory memory

A new study suggests Risso's dolphins, which are common along the U.S. Pacific Coast, use past experiences to plan their dives for food. Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr hide caption

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Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr

Risso's Dolphin Group

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Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Eating Leafy Greens Each Day Tied to Sharper Memory, Slower Decline

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A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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As people age they may forget more because their brain waves get out of sync, new research finds. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

Older Adults' Forgetfulness Tied To Faulty Brain Rhythms In Sleep

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Want to get smarter? Brain training games don't seem to help with that. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

In Memory Training Smackdown, One Method Dominates

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Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Alzheimer's Starts To Steal The Joy Of Being A Grandfather

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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Memory athletes like Sue Jin Yang — competing here in the 17th annual USA Memory Championship in New York City in 2014 — wear headphones to block out distractions as they memorize the order of decks of cards. Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images

Maybe You, Too, Could Become A Super Memorizer

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them

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