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Pussy Riot

Pyotr Verzilov, a member of the feminist protest group Pussy Riot, photographed during an interview with The Associated Press in Moscow, in early September. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

The CEO of Berlin's Charite Hospital, Karl Max Einhaeupl (left), and leading doctor Kai-Uwe Eckardt discuss the health of Pyotr Verzilov in Berlin on Tuesday. Verzilov, a member of Russian punk protest band Pussy Riot, was flown to Germany on Sept. 16 after a suspected poisoning. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Pyotr Verzilov, left, the unofficial spokesperson of the Russian activist group Pussy Riot, along with Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Nadya Tolokonnikova, founding members of the group. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

A member of the Russian protest-art group Pussy Riot is escorted by stewards during the Russia 2018 World Cup final match between France and Croatia. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion: An Act Of Bravery At The World Cup

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"[Putin] created what we call in Russia an atmosphere of hatred," Nadya Tolokonnikova says. "And that's what Donald Trump is doing here right now." YouTube hide caption

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Pussy Riot's Nadya Tolokonnikova On Her New Anti-Trump Song

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Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (center) and Maria Alyokhina (left) leave a police station near Sochi on Feb. 18, 2014. They'd been arrested earlier in the host city of the 2014 Winter Olympics and walked free after being questioned about an alleged theft from a hotel. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As members of the punk protest group Pussy Riot recorded a song and video in Sochi this week, a uniformed Cossack used a whip to try to stop them. The attack ended up being part of the band's video. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

Maria Alyokhina (left) and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova of Pussy Riot on stage at Amnesty International's "Bringing Human Rights Home" concert earlier this month in Brooklyn, N.Y. Jason Szenes /EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jason Szenes /EPA/Landov

Maria Alyokhina, after her release from prison on Monday in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. Sergei Karpukhin /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Sergei Karpukhin /Reuters/Landov

Former Yukos oil company CEO Mikhail Khodorkovsky looks through the defendant's glass cage in a Moscow courtroom on Nov. 1, 2010. Alexey Sazonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexey Sazonov/AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin (far left) looks on Monday in Hanover, Germany, as one of three women who stripped off their tops protests his appearance at a trade fair. German Chancellor Angela Merkel is in the green jacket. Jochen Luebke /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Jochen Luebke /EPA /LANDOV

From the NPR Newscast: Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson on the protest in Hanover

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Members of the all-girl punk band Pussy Riot: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (right), Maria Alyokhina (center) and Yekaterina Samutsevich (left) in a glass-walled cage during a court hearing in Moscow earlier today. Andrey Smirnov /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Smirnov /AFP/Getty Images