refugees refugees
Stories About

refugees

South America has a tradition of offering a haven to refugees, including my grandfather, Miguel Garsd, pictured here in Argentina, where he began practicing medicine in the 1930s. His family had fled pogroms in the Ukraine in the late 1800s. Courtesy of Jasmine Garsd hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jasmine Garsd

Canada has pledged to accept 25,000 Syrian refugees, likely including women, children and injured people who have been living in camps in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Here, children stand outside their tents during a sandstorm, in a refugee camp in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in September. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bilal Hussein/AP

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is one of a growing number of state leaders who oppose efforts to resettle Syrian refugees inside their states. He is shown here during a meeting with reporters in June. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

In Berlin, the Rev. Gottfried Martens lights a candle during a service to baptize Iranians in the Trinity Church. Iranian and Afghan converts make up most of the 900-member congregation. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Markus Schreiber/AP

For Some Muslim Asylum-Seekers In Germany, Christianity Beckons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/454670739/455286504" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shukri al-Assoli has settled for now in Athens, where he shares an apartment with another Palestinian migrant in a working-class neighborhood. Giannis Pazios for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Giannis Pazios for NPR

For Victims Of A Migrant Shipwreck, Justice Remains Elusive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/453961042/454051777" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Omar holds his daughter, Taiba, at the playground near the family's new home in Toledo. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Gilkey/NPR

Among The Lucky Few: Syrian Family Rebuilds In America's Heartland

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/450221327/450321221" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mustafa Abdul Saleh (at right front), a 20-year-old Kurd from Syria, confers with a Kurdish interpreter (left), during his trial in Szeged, Hungary. Saleh passed through a hole in the razor wire fence that Hungary has built on its border with Serbia. Breaching the fence is a criminal offense, and Saleh was expelled from Hungary and ordered back into Serbia. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Hungary Steps Up Arrest And Deportation Of Migrants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/447166825/448059262" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript