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Osama and Ghada sit on the deck of their home in Princeton, N.J. They and their children are refugees from Syria and have been resettled with help from the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Jake Naughton for NPR hide caption

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Jake Naughton for NPR

After Trump's Election, Uncertainty For Syrian Refugees In The U.S.

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Mohamed Gabril, a refugee who became an American citizen, works at a Somali-owned grocery in Utica, N.Y. He's convinced the U.S. Constitution will protect him from any backlash under Donald Trump. Brian Mann/NCPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NCPR

In Upstate New York, A Refugee Haven Prepares For Trump Presidency

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A counterdemonstrator holds a sign during a gathering in New York City to show solidarity with Syrian and Iraqi refugees last year. Donald Trump's hard-line campaign rhetoric singled out Syrian refugees. "If I win," he told a New Hampshire rally, "they are going back." Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

For Refugees And Advocates, An Anxious Wait For Clarity On Trump's Policy

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A family disembarks from the Topaz Responder, a rescue ship, Oct. 27 at Brindisi in southern Italy. The ship arrived with 347 migrants and refugees from Central Africa and Syria following a rescue operation off the Libyan coast. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Italy Becomes A Leading Destination For Migrants, Matching Greece

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The Detroit area is the No. 1 destination in the state for Syrian refugees, but a local leader says it's time for that to stop. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Michigan Community Clashes Over Embrace Of Immigrants

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Refuge Coffee is a nonprofit gourmet food truck that employees refugees resettled in Clarkston, Ga., and provides job training and networking opportunities within the community. Anjali Enjeti for NPR hide caption

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Anjali Enjeti for NPR

Marsha Lewis, a semi-retired teacher, is one of the volunteers helping Syrian refugee Fadi al-Asmi, standing in the kitchen of Hartford's City Steam Brewery. Asmi, who co-owned a pastry shop in Damascus, now makes desserts at this Hartford cafe. Courtesy of Richard Groothuis hide caption

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Courtesy of Richard Groothuis

For Syrian Refugees In Connecticut, A Helping Hand From Private Volunteers

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Qui Nguyen wrote Vietgone to tell the story of his parents' meeting at a Vietnamese refugee camp in Arkansas in 1975. Jesse Dittmar/Courtesy of Qui Nguyen hide caption

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Jesse Dittmar/Courtesy of Qui Nguyen

'Vietgone': A Sex Comedy About Mom, Dad And Refugee Camps

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Chad Riley/Getty Images hide caption

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Chad Riley/Getty Images

The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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Migrants walk past makeshift shops and shelters at a camp known as "The Jungle" in Calais, France, on Sept. 6. Overcrowding has become an issue in the camp. "I imagined a little camp," says Calais resident Nicole Cordier, who has protested against The Jungle. "Not an immense camp like this one. This is a city." Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

For One French Woman, An Eye-Opening Visit To Calais' Refugee 'Jungle'

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Job consultant Saskia Ben jemaa sits in a welcome center for immigrants on Aug. 18 in Berlin. The center assists immigrants and refugees with asylum status in finding jobs, housing and qualification recognition of their previous employment and education. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Australian protesters demonstrate in Melbourne on Feb. 4 after the Australian High Court upheld a challenge to the government's right to hold asylum seekers at detention camps in Papua New Guinea and Nauru. Asanka Brendon Ratnayake/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Asanka Brendon Ratnayake/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

What Happens When An Aid Group Sees Abuse, But Is Sworn To Secrecy?

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Firas Awad (left) and wife Tamam Aldrawsha, from Syria, spend hours studying German every day. Awad wants to complete the pharmacy studies he abandoned because of the Syrian war, and Aldrawsha wants to become a nurse. "I want to be useful," she says. "Useful for my family and useful for this country." Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

In A Tiny German Town, Residents And Refugees Adapt

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