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Naser al-Shimary, deported this year to Iraq from the U.S., greets his four-year-old son Vincent at Baghdad international airport. Shimary had lived in the U.S. since he was five years old. He agreed to be deported under a practice halted by a U.S. court this summer. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'They Know I'm Different': Deportee Struggles In Iraq After Decades Living In U.S.

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Honduran migrants walk toward Tecún Umán, a Guatemalan town along the Mexican border, as they leave Guatemala City on Thursday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

A 12-year-old Iranian refugee girl, who had tried to set herself on fire with petrol, rests in a bed in Nauru, where nearly 1,000 refugees and asylum seekers have been sent by the government of Australia. Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images

the U.N. says the Rohingya are "the most persecuted minority in the world." Above, refugees cross a river to a temporary camp after crossing from Myanmar to Bangladesh. Ahmed Salahuddin/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmed Salahuddin/Getty Images

A wildfire raged near the Moria refugee camp, pictured here, on Greece's Lesbos Island. The camp is home to an estimated 9,000 migrants and refugees. ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

Mohammad Alahmad, a Syrian academic, speaks at a New University in Exile Consortium event last week. Alahmad continued teaching at Raqqa University until ISIS shut down the school. "I decided to stay to help students," he said, "to continue teaching as much as we can." He and his family left Syria after the university was shut down. Ben Ferrari/The New School hide caption

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Ben Ferrari/The New School

Tima Kurdi holds her necklace bearing a photograph of her nephews, Alan (left) and Ghalib Kurdi. She is the author of The Boy on the Beach: My Family's Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home. Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images

In the Balukhali refugee camp, boys between the ages of seven and 11 play with forfori, homemade toy airplanes. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

In Bangladeshi Camps, Rohingya Refugees Try To Move Forward With Their Lives

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Nicaraguan refugees fleeing their country due to unrest sleep in a Christian church in San José, Costa Rica, on July 28. Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters hide caption

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Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

200 Nicaraguans Claim Asylum Daily In Costa Rica, Fleeing Violent Unrest

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Balukhali Rohingya refugee camp Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Forced To Flee Myanmar, Rohingya Refugees Face Monsoon Landslides In Bangladesh

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Dildar Begum, 30, in her shelter in the Hakimpara Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. She says 29 members of her extended family were killed a year ago in what the U.S. has said was a campaign of ethnic cleansing by the Myanmar military. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

'I Would Rather Die Than Go Back': Rohingya Refugees Settle Into Life In Bangladesh

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African migrants climb over a metal fence that divides Morocco and the Spanish enclave of Melilla. Since the early 1990s, Spain has built 20-foot-tall, layered border fences around its two North African enclaves, Ceuta and Melilla, to help dissuade migrants from entering the cities from Morocco in the hope of reaching a better a life in Europe. Santi Palacios/AP hide caption

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Santi Palacios/AP