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Syrian refugee women hold their children in a refugee compound in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

2018 Was A Year Of Drastic Cuts To U.S. Refugee Admissions

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A refugee transit center on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, in a photo taken last year. Two class action lawsuits are seeking injunctions to transfer refugees held there to Australia and award damages to them. Aziz Abdul/AP hide caption

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Aziz Abdul/AP

In this Sept. 1, 2015, file photo, a child waits in line at a migrant reception center in Brussels. Belgian migration minister Theo Francken said on Thursday he wants no part of a United Nations pact on safe and orderly migration, an international deal that has pushed Belgium's government to the brink of collapse. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

A U.N. Migration Pact Is Dividing Europe — And Has Become Fodder For Nationalists

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A migrant receives medical attention at a former paper factory in Greece that has been turned into a makeshift camp. Menelaos Michalatos/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Menelaos Michalatos/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Naser al-Shimary, deported this year to Iraq from the U.S., greets his four-year-old son Vincent at Baghdad international airport. Shimary had lived in the U.S. since he was five years old. He agreed to be deported under a practice halted by a U.S. court this summer. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'They Know I'm Different': Deportee Struggles In Iraq After Decades Living In U.S.

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Honduran migrants walk toward Tecún Umán, a Guatemalan town along the Mexican border, as they leave Guatemala City on Thursday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

A 12-year-old Iranian refugee girl, who had tried to set herself on fire with petrol, rests in a bed in Nauru, where nearly 1,000 refugees and asylum seekers have been sent by the government of Australia. Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images

the U.N. says the Rohingya are "the most persecuted minority in the world." Above, refugees cross a river to a temporary camp after crossing from Myanmar to Bangladesh. Ahmed Salahuddin/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmed Salahuddin/Getty Images

A wildfire raged near the Moria refugee camp, pictured here, on Greece's Lesbos Island. The camp is home to an estimated 9,000 migrants and refugees. ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

Mohammad Alahmad, a Syrian academic, speaks at a New University in Exile Consortium event last week. Alahmad continued teaching at Raqqa University until ISIS shut down the school. "I decided to stay to help students," he said, "to continue teaching as much as we can." He and his family left Syria after the university was shut down. Ben Ferrari/The New School hide caption

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Ben Ferrari/The New School

Tima Kurdi holds her necklace bearing a photograph of her nephews, Alan (left) and Ghalib Kurdi. She is the author of The Boy on the Beach: My Family's Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home. Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images

In the Balukhali refugee camp, boys between the ages of seven and 11 play with forfori, homemade toy airplanes. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

In Bangladeshi Camps, Rohingya Refugees Try To Move Forward With Their Lives

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