refugees refugees

A demonstration in Copenhagen, Denmark, in support of Syrian migrants. A new study looks at the benefit of offering physical and psychological support to refugees who have been tortured. Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images

Hate crimes are on the rise in Poland. In response, a new YouTube video aspires to foster tolerance by having people from marginalized groups bake and sell bread to customers at a Warsaw bakery. Above, some of the loaves baked and handed out as part of the campaign. Each loaf is wrapped in a black ribbon with a photo and information about the person who baked it. Anna Bińczyk hide caption

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Anna Bińczyk

Like other spring holidays, Sere Sal, the Yazidi new year, is about fertility and new life. An ancient Kurdish religious minority, the Yazidis color eggs for the holiday in honor of the colors that Tawus Melek, God's chief angel, is said to have spread throughout the new world. Nawaf Ashur hide caption

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Nawaf Ashur

Displaced Syrians, who fled their homes in the city of Deir ez-Zor, carry boxes of United Nations aid at a camp in Syria's northeastern Hassakeh province in February. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Has Accepted Only 11 Syrian Refugees This Year

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Mohamed Hamza, a Bronx-based cellphone shop owner, is a U.S. citizen from Yemen. His 3-year-old son is also a U.S. citizen, but Hamza's wife and another child are not — and have not received visas to travel to the U.S. Hamza's wife and the two children are stuck for now in Djibouti. Melissa Bunni Elian for NPR hide caption

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Melissa Bunni Elian for NPR

Families Divided: President Trump's Travel Ban Strands Some U.S. Citizens Abroad

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An Iranian woman prays at St. Joseph's Cathedral in Tehran, Iran, a country where Christians and other religious groups have faced persecution. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

100 Iranians Remain Stranded In Austria Awaiting Asylum In The U.S.

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Detainees stand in a hall at a detention center for migrants in Al Kararim, Libya. The North African country is a key transit spot and destination for migrants seeking employment or a path to Europe. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

Migrants Captured In Libya Say They End Up Sold As Slaves

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Rasha al-Ahmad, 25, washes her hands with donated bottled water inside a tent her family put up next to the Moria refugee camp. Her 1-year-old daughter, Tamar, is next to her. "The biggest challenge is keeping myself and my children clean," she says. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

African migrants leaving an Israeli government immigration office in Bnei Brak, Israel. Posters in Arabic and Tigrinya on the wall announce Israel's "voluntary departure" policy for Sudanese and Eritrean migrants. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Israel Gives African Asylum-Seekers A Choice: Deportation Or Jail

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Italian far-right party activists hold a banner reading "fatherland" during a demonstration against a government proposal to reform citizenship procedures for the descendants of immigrants living in Italy, in Rome, Nov. 4, 2017. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

Anti-Migrant Slogans Are Overshadowing Italy's Election Race

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A crowd waits to cross the border into Colombia over the Simón Bolívar bridge in San Antonio del Táchira, Venezuela, in July 2016. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuela's Deepening Crisis Triggers Mass Migration Into Colombia

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Fayes Khamal tests out a kite he's just made in the Hakimpara Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

A 10-Year-Old Kid Is Making Magic With His Kites

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Sanura Begum stands with her son, Abdur Sobor, outside her plastic and bamboo shelter in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh. One of the things she misses most about Myanmar is her family's wooden house. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

A Young Rohingya Mom: Pregnant, Stateless, Living In Limbo

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A woman carries water up a steep hill in the Balukhali Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. Aid workers say these slopes may collapse in the coming monsoon rains. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Monsoon Rains Could Devastate Rohingya Camps

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