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Benjamin Raphael of Nigeria (left) is a salesman who had never picked up a paint brush before he found asylum in Italy. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Painting Their Old Life Helps Them Build A New Life In Italy

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A handout photo from the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship shows the detention camp at Manus Island in 2012. Some asylum-seekers are heading to the U.S. for resettlement. Getty Images hide caption

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The team that won the Hult Prize poses with their trophy on September 16 at U.N. headquarters. From left: Gia Farooqi, Hanaa Lakhani, Moneeb Mian, and Hasan Usmani. They developed a ride-sharing rickshaw service for refugees in a Pakistan slum. Jason DeCrow/Hult Prize Foundation via AP Ima hide caption

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Jason DeCrow/Hult Prize Foundation via AP Ima

Rohingya refugees arrive in Bangladesh on Sunday. They are fleeing government violence in Myanmar. Allison Joyce/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Joyce/Getty Images

Bangladesh Copes With Chaos: Rohingya Refugees Are 'Coming And Coming'

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Syrian refugee children play at an informal refugee camp in Lebanon's Bekaa valley. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

In Lebanon, Syrian Refugees Met With Harassment And Hostility

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Much of Albert Einstein's best-known work, including his famous formula, was conducted in Europe, but when the Nazis came to power, he and other famous scientists brought their talent to the U.S. Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Arabic signs have replaced Turkish ones in Istanbul's Fatih neighborhood, where many Syrian refugees have settled. Turkey has absorbed some 3 million Syrian refugees since the Syrian war began. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

For Syrian Refugees In Turkey, A Long Road To Regular Employment

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Montreal's iconic Olympic Stadium, photographed in 2012, is now providing housing for newly arrived asylum seekers entering Canada from the U.S. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

A woman walks with a Syrian flag during a rally for World Refugee Day across from the White House in Washington, D.C., on June 20. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

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Guests attend a Refugees Welcome dinner at Lapis restaurant in Washington, D.C. The goals of the evening: to bring locals together with refugees in their community and to break barriers by breaking bread. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR