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Forensic personnel load the corpse of a man into a van, after he was executed at a shopping mall in Acapulco, Mexico, on April 24, 2018. A new report recorded more than 33,000 homicides in 2018, making it the country's deadliest on record. Francisco Robles/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Robles/AFP/Getty Images

Mexican journalist Javier Valdez speaks at the International Book Fair in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 2016. He was killed by a gunman on Monday. Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images

Nayarit state Attorney General Edgar Veytia was arrested on drug trafficking charges at the U.S.-Mexico border this week. Here, the Nayarit state attorney general's headquarters is seen in Tepic, Mexico. Cesar Rodriguez/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Cesar Rodriguez/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Mexican state police stand guard in May 2015 near a shootout between authorities and suspected criminals in Michoacan. Mexico's National Human Rights Commission said Thursday that 22 people were arbitrarily killed by federal police during that raid. Refugio Ruiz/AP hide caption

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Refugio Ruiz/AP

A Mexican soldier stands guard next to marijuana packages in Tijuana following the discovery of a tunnel under the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

'Narconomics': How The Drug Cartels Operate Like Wal-Mart And McDonald's

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Top Official Says Inside Help Was Likely In 'El Chapo' Escape

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Maximum Security Not Enough As Mexican Drug Lord Stages Second Escape

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The alleged leader of the Zetas drug cartel, Omar Trevino Morales, is taken under custody to be presented to the press at the Attorney General Office's hangar at the airport in Mexico City, on March 4. Mexican authorities captured Trevino Wednesday, dealing a blow to the feared gang and giving the embattled government a second major arrest in a week. Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico Takes Out Cartel Heads, But Crime Continues To Climb

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Pablo Cote holds a photo of his deceased father of the same name in July 2013 in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cote was kidnapped while driving back from the U.S. border to the east-central state of Tlaxcala. He was beaten to death, part of the mass killing of 193 bus passengers and other travelers by the Zetas. Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP hide caption

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Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP

Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26. Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images

43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico

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Reny Pineda was born in Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up in Los Angeles. In 2010 he returned to his homeland, and joined a vigilante battle against a ruthless cartel ruling the region. Now the Mexican government has ordered the civilian militias to disband, and Pineda picks lemons in this orchard. Alan Ortega /KQED hide caption

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Alan Ortega /KQED

Migrant Heads Home To Mexico — And Joins Fight Against Cartel

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Workers sort through key limes at a packaging house in Apatzingan, Michoacan. More than 90 percent of limes imported into the U.S. come from Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

With Cartels On The Run, Mexican Lime Farmers Keep More Of The Green

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