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One World Trade Center (WTC) stands in the lower Manhattan skyline as birds fly over the Hudson River in Hoboken, New Jersey, on Feb. 8, 2019. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An American coot flies over Brooklyn's Prospect Park Lake on Feb. 5. Courtesy of August Davidson-Onsgard hide caption

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Courtesy of August Davidson-Onsgard

Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count

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Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count

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Gulls were eating more juvenile salmon than biologists realized, which meant fewer of the fish were making it to the ocean. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

Axel Hirschfeld looks at the remains of dead birds while holding a Levant sparrowhawk. The bird was found locked in a small enclosure without food or water in a field used by poachers in the town of Ras Baalbek, Lebanon, in September. Sam Tarling for NPR hide caption

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Sam Tarling for NPR

This turkey seemed to be in a fowl mood in 1987 when President Ronald Reagan used the word "pardon" for the first time in reference to sparing a Thanksgiving turkey. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The Peregrine Fund recently released four California condors over high cliffs in Northern Arizona. In 1982, there were only 22 of these giant birds left in the wild. George Andrejko/Courtesy, Arizona Game and Fish Department hide caption

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George Andrejko/Courtesy, Arizona Game and Fish Department

The Flight Of The Condors, And Their Audience

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Jane Tansell, one of the two handlers responsible for the rodent detection dogs, looks on from the background as a camera captures wildlife on South Georgia Island earlier this year. Oliver Prince/Courtesy of South Georgia Heritage Trust hide caption

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Oliver Prince/Courtesy of South Georgia Heritage Trust

A CT-scan image of the skull of an ancient bird shows how one of the earliest bird beaks worked as a pincer, in the way beaks of modern birds do, but also had teeth left over from dinosaur ancestors. The animal, called Ichthyornis, lived around 100 million years ago in what is now North America. Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group hide caption

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Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group

How Did Birds Lose Their Teeth And Get Their Beaks? Study Offers Clues

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