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Seen through a glass window, presidential candidate Rodrigo Chaves reacts after marking his ballot during a runoff presidential election, at a polling station, in San Jose, Costa Rica, on Sunday. Carlos Gonzalez/AP hide caption

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Carlos Gonzalez/AP

Costa Rica's Ian Lawrence (right) vies for the ball with U.S. player DeAndre Yedlin during their FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 CONCACAF qualifier match in San Jose, Costa Rica, on Wednesday. Ezequiel Becerra/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ezequiel Becerra/AFP via Getty Images

Relatives and friends attend the burial of teenager Matt Romero in Managua, Nicaragua, last September. He was shot dead during clashes between anti-government protesters and riot police and paramilitaries. Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images

Stay Or Go? Ortega's Crackdown Pushes Nicaraguans To Make Hard Choices

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After bad weather forced it to reroute, the Royal Caribbean cruise ship Empress of the Seas rescued two stranded fishermen last week between Grand Cayman and Jamaica. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Nicaraguan refugees fleeing their country due to unrest sleep in a Christian church in San José, Costa Rica, on July 28. Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters hide caption

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Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

200 Nicaraguans Claim Asylum Daily In Costa Rica, Fleeing Violent Unrest

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Scientists have videotaped sharks traveling a 500-mile-long "shark highway" in the Pacific Ocean. Andy Mann/Waitt Foundation/Pacifico hide caption

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Andy Mann/Waitt Foundation/Pacifico

Scientists Take A Ride On The Pacific's 'Shark Highway'

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S. Fitzgerald Haney, former U.S. ambassador to Costa Rica, with his wife, Andrea, on that country's Dancing with the Stars. He is donating his stipend to a local cancer institute. Via Teletica hide caption

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Via Teletica

Former U.S. Ambassador To Costa Rica Dances With The Stars

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A Costa Rican Red Cross member distributes food to migrants in an encampment of Africans in Penas Blancas, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, on July 19. In a makeshift camp hundreds of tents shelter Haitians, Congolese, Senegalese and Ghanaian migrants waiting to continue their journey to the United States. Ezequiel Becerra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezequiel Becerra/AFP/Getty Images

Costa Rica Becomes A Magnet For Migrants

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On display at ZooAve Animal Rescue in Alajuela, Costa Rica, Grecia, the chestnut-mandibled toucan, can now eat on its own and sing with the new beak. Grecia was in rehabilitation for months after receiving a 3-D-printed nylon prosthesis. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

After Losing Half A Beak, Grecia The Toucan Becomes A Symbol Against Abuse

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A woman builds a fire at a migrant camp on the Costa Rica-Panama border. The area has seen a recent surge of migrants coming from Africa, hoping to make it to the U.S. Rolando Arrieta/NPR hide caption

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Rolando Arrieta/NPR

Via Cargo Ships and Jungle Treks, Africans Dream Of Reaching The U.S.

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew (foreground) with six Cubans who were picked up in the Florida Straits in May. A larger Coast Guard vessel is in the background. The number of Cubans trying to reach the U.S. has soared in the past year. Many Cubans believe it will be more difficult to enter the U.S. as relations improve, though U.S. officials say there will be no rule changes in the near term. Tony Winton/AP hide caption

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Tony Winton/AP

Cuban Immigrants Flow Into The U.S., Fearing The Rules Will Change

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Luis Fernando Vasquez has been a coffee farmer in the central valley of Costa Rica his entire life. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Coffee For A Cause: What Do Those Feel-Good Labels Deliver?

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