food insecurity food insecurity

Dorothy Boddie runs the outreach ministry at Allen Chapel AME, one of the Capital Area Food Bank's nonprofit partners. The D.C.-area food bank is part of a growing trend to move toward healthier options in food assistance, because many in the population it serves suffer from high blood pressure and diabetes. Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank hide caption

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Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank

Customers check out the produce at a Curbside Market truck parked at Andrews Terrace, a large apartment complex in downtown Rochester. The program is part of Foodlink's efforts to help poor communities have access to fresh and healthy foods. Courtesy of FoodLink hide caption

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Courtesy of FoodLink

Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on. Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images

Volunteers distribute free food at the mobile pantry in Hurley, Va. Poverty in the coal-mining region is 29 percent, twice the national average. Unemployment is also high, and younger families are moving out. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

In Some Rural Counties, Hunger Is Rising, But Food Donations Aren't

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and celebrity chef Tom Colicchio discuss the farm bill as part of the Plate of the Union campaign on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Food Policy Act hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Food Policy Act

Celebrity Chef Tom Colicchio: 'We Can End Hunger In This Country'

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Kara Dethlefsen, an active-duty Marine, attends the monthly food pantry at the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base near San Diego. Her husband is also a Marine. She says the food assistance is helping them get ready for his transition back to civilian life. The couple has a 4-month-old daughter. Dorian Merina/KPCC hide caption

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Dorian Merina/KPCC

Volunteers gather bags of groceries for people seeking assistance at a food pantry in Concord, Mass. Many groups that help low-income families get food aid say they've seen an alarming drop recently in the number of immigrants applying for help. Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images

Deportation Fears Prompt Immigrants To Cancel Food Stamps

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A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR

Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images

Nonperishable food is restocked in Maggie Ballard's "blessing box" in Wichita, Kan., several times a day. Deborah Shaar/KMUW hide caption

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Deborah Shaar/KMUW

A New Type Of Food Pantry Is Sprouting In Yards Across America

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Student Nicola Hopper, 11, and Jake Hensley, 11, load milk cartons and other food collected by students at Franklin Sherman Elementary School into crates to be taken across the street to Share food pantry at McLean Baptist Church. Victoria Milko/NPR hide caption

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Victoria Milko/NPR

When Food Banks Say No To Sugary Junk, Schools Offer A Solution

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Two people at a food pantry in Portland, Maine, choose items from a display of produce. Several food banks around the country have been trying something new to get people to choose healthier foods. And it's working. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Food Pantries Try Nutritional Nudging To Encourage Good Food Choices

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Joel McKinney stands beside a hydroponic tower that is part of his farm outside the Five Loaves and Two Fishes Food Bank. Roxy Todd/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Roxy Todd/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In Coal Country, Farmers Get Creative To Bridge The Fresh Produce Gap

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Many kids rely on school for food their families can't afford. Two reports suggest one group is falling through the cracks: teens. Dogged by hunger, teens may try a wide range of strategies to get by. Meriel Jane Waissman/Getty Images hide caption

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Meriel Jane Waissman/Getty Images

Walrus, shown here on a drying rack, represents a major source of nutritious food for many in Alaska's St. Lawrence Island. In recent years, warmer temperatures have pushed the sea ice farther from St. Lawrence's shores, making walrus hunting more challenging. This shortfall has led to increased food insecurity on the island. Courtesy of Cara Durr hide caption

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Courtesy of Cara Durr

Nearly one-third of households on SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, still have to visit a food pantry to keep themselves fed, according to USDA data. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A few cities around the country are letting drivers cover part or all of their parking fines with food donations. Amber Riccinto/Ocala Star-Banner /Landov hide caption

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Amber Riccinto/Ocala Star-Banner /Landov

Kids and parents often shy away from talking about their struggles at the doctor's office. But the American Academy of Pediatrics is now urging its members to screen kids for food insecurity during well-child visits. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Are You Hungry? Pediatricians Add A New Question During Checkups

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The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP