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Baltimore Ravens outside linebacker Terrell Suggs (from left), Mike Wallace, former player Ray Lewis and inside linebacker C.J. Mosley kneel during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and the Ravens at Wembley Stadium in London on Sunday. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

American gold medalist Tommie Smith (center) and bronze medalist John Carlos raise their fists in the air in a black power salute during the playing of the U.S. national anthem at the 1968 Olympics. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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Anonymous/AP

Baltimore Ravens fans exchange the jersey of the team's former running back Ray Rice at M&T Bank Stadium Friday. "He should have been the man here and backed away" instead of hitting his fiancee, a female fan says. Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Smith/Getty Images

The Baltimore Ravens released running back Ray Rice from the team Monday, after video emerged of him assaulting his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer. On Tuesday, Janay Rice said the media has exploited a moment that they both regret. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs waits on the field after the half the lights went out in the third quarter of Sunday's Super Bowl against the San Francisco 49ers in New Orleans. Mike Segar /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Mike Segar /Reuters /Landov

From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mike Pesca on the Super Bowl

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Head coach Jim Harbaugh (left) of the San Francisco 49ers and his brother, head coach John Harbaugh of the Baltimore Ravens, before a game on Thanksgiving Day 2011. Their teams will meet again in the Super Bowl. Rob Carr/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Carr/Getty Images

From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mike Pesca on the Ravens' win

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Art Modell, then the owner of the Baltimore Ravens, with the Vince Lombardi Trophy after his team beat the New York Giants in the January 2001 Super Bowl. Jeff Haynes /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Haynes /AFP/Getty Images