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President Trump's proposal to end the partial government shutdown includes not only funding for an expanded border wall, parts of which can be seen from Tijuana, Mexico, but also provisions that further restrict asylum seekers. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun (center) is welcomed by Canadian Minister for Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland as she arrives at Pearson International Airport in Toronto, Ontario, on Saturday. The young Saudi woman who fled her family successfully harnessed the power of Twitter to secure asylum in Canada. Lars Hagberg /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Hagberg /AFP/Getty Images

Saudi woman Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun walks by Thai Chief of Immigration Police Maj. Gen. Surachate Hakparn (right) before leaving the Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok. Australia says it is considering granting refugee resettlement to the Saudi, who fled from her family, based on referral by the U.N. Immigration Police via AP hide caption

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Immigration Police via AP

Chief Justice John Roberts says the Supreme Court "doesn't have Obama judges, or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges." Win McNamee/AP hide caption

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Win McNamee/AP

Chief Justice Roberts Issues Rare Rebuke To Trump; Trump Fires Back

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Migrants from Central America ride in a truck Monday as they travel toward the U.S. on the Mexico City-Puebla highway. Thursday, the Trump administration issued new a new rule for asylum-seekers. Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Seeks To Limit Asylum-Seekers With New Rule

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Sisters from Guatemala seeking asylum, cross a bridge to a port of entry in to the United States from Matamoros, Mexico, in Brownsville, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Denied Asylum, But Terrified To Return Home

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Juan Lopez Aguilar (left), a Maya man who fled violence in Guatemala three years ago, tells Dr. Nick Nelson he fears returning to the land of his birth. "There are a lot of gangs," he tells the doctor. "They want to kill people in my community." Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Medical Clinics That Treat Refugees Help Determine The Case For Asylum

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ICE Has New Ways To Keep Asylum-Seekers And Their Kids Apart, Critics Say

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Tuba and Cevheri Guven, both journalists, fled to Thessaloniki after being targeted by their own government. Turkey has imprisoned 262 journalists, making it the world's largest jailer of journalists. "If you write something on Twitter, you can go directly to prison," Tuba says. Joanna Kakissis/For NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/For NPR

Turks Fleeing To Greece Find Mostly Warm Welcome, Despite History

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An El Salvadoran child is interviewed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into the U.S. to seek asylum on Apr. 14, 2016, in Roma, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

In Their Search For Asylum, Central Americans Find The U.S. Is Closing Its Doors

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Alfredo Trejo, 18, came to the U.S. from El Salvador in 2014 as an unaccompanied minor and now lives with his aunt in Virginia. He applied for asylum, and, like many others, he says he fled persecution from gang members in San Salvador. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The West Kensington Ministry church in Philadelphia, seen here in 2014, is one of about a dozen churches offering sanctuary to Central American immigrants who are under deportation orders. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

U.S. Churches Offer Safe Haven For A New Generation Of Immigrants

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An adult immigrant from El Salvador who entered the country illegally wears an ankle monitor July 27 at a shelter in San Antonio. Lawyers representing immigrant mothers held in a South Texas detention center say the women have been denied counsel and coerced into accepting ankle-monitoring bracelets as a condition of release, even after judges made clear that paying their bonds would suffice. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Asylum Seekers Swap Prison Beds For Ankle Bracelets, Same Firm Profits

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Asylum seekers rally in front of the German Office for Migration and Refugees with vests that read "no one is illegal" in Nuremberg on Aug. 17. Migrants from Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Iran and Syria called for faster asylum procedures, the freedom to choose their accommodation and the abolition of camps where they must stay. Timm Schamberger/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Timm Schamberger/EPA/LANDOV

Seeking Asylum In Germany Can Mean Living In Limbo

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A 16-year-old refugee shows the scars he received while held on a human trafficking boat. Evidence of physical violence like this lends credence to the stories of those seeking asylum in the U.S. It's Dr. Katherine McKenzie's job to evaluate it. Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters/Landov

Before Obtaining Asylum, Refugees Must Show The Scars Behind The Stories

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Chantel, 3, and Antoni, 7 months, migrated to Spain from their native Cameroon, with their mother Tatiana Kanga, 25. Tatiana was nine months pregnant with Antoni when they crossed the Mediterranean Sea together in an inflatable boat. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

9 Months Pregnant, An African Woman Risks It All And Heads To Europe

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Berlin residents Mareike Geiling (left) and her boyfriend, Jonas Kakoschke, speak with their roommate, a Muslim refugee from Mali. Geiling and Kokoschke helped launch a website that matches Germans willing to share their homes with new arrivals. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Germans Open Their Homes To Refugee Roommates

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