Black Hole Black Hole

An artist's rendering shows the Milky Way where a supermassive black hole lies at the center. A dozen smaller black holes have now been detected, and a new study suggests the monster is surrounded by about 10,000. Spitzer Space Telescope/NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech) hide caption

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Spitzer Space Telescope/NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)

Center Of The Milky Way Has Thousands Of Black Holes, Study Shows

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Astronomers have discovered a star, shown in an artist's rendition, that appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun. L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO

An artist's conception of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature

A jet emanating from galaxy M87 can be seen in this July 6, 2000, photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA hide caption

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J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA

An artist's impression of a white dwarf in an extremely close orbit around what's believed to be a black hole. The star is so close that much of its material is being pulled away. X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss hide caption

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X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

An artist's rendering shows gas falling into a supermassive black hole, creating a quasar. Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital; SDSS collaboration hide caption

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Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital; SDSS collaboration

Solving The Mystery Of The Disappearing Quasar

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The inset image shows X-ray arcs that astronomers say are signs of galactic burping in the Messier 51 galaxy system, captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. X ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E.Schlegel et al; Optical: NASA/STScI hide caption

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X ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E.Schlegel et al; Optical: NASA/STScI