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The first-ever image of a black hole was released Wednesday by a consortium of researchers, showing the "black hole at the center of galaxy M87, outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon." Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al hide caption

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Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al

An artist's rendering shows the Milky Way where a supermassive black hole lies at the center. A dozen smaller black holes have now been detected, and a new study suggests the monster is surrounded by about 10,000. Spitzer Space Telescope/NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech) hide caption

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Spitzer Space Telescope/NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)

Center Of The Milky Way Has Thousands Of Black Holes, Study Shows

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Astronomers have discovered a star, shown in an artist's rendition, that appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun. L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO

An artist's conception of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature

A jet emanating from galaxy M87 can be seen in this July 6, 2000, photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA hide caption

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J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA

An artist's impression of a white dwarf in an extremely close orbit around what's believed to be a black hole. The star is so close that much of its material is being pulled away. X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss hide caption

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X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

An artist's rendering shows gas falling into a supermassive black hole, creating a quasar. Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital; SDSS collaboration hide caption

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Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital; SDSS collaboration

Solving The Mystery Of The Disappearing Quasar

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The inset image shows X-ray arcs that astronomers say are signs of galactic burping in the Messier 51 galaxy system, captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. X ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E.Schlegel et al; Optical: NASA/STScI hide caption

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X ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E.Schlegel et al; Optical: NASA/STScI