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farm workers

A Cambodian migrant farm worker stands outside the greenhouse where she works growing vegetables in Miryang, South Korea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

As Workforce Ages, South Korea Increasingly Depends On Migrant Labor

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These men, harvesting sweet potatoes in North Carolina, came to the U.S. on H-2A visas that are designated for seasonal agricultural workers. Such "guest workers" now account for about 10% of U.S. farmworkers. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Farmworkers Say The Government Is Trying To Cut Their Wages

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Syrian refugee Mohammad al-Saleh near Amman. He and his wife are farm laborers and were working in the fields when their tent caught fire in June, killing their four youngest children. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'No Hope': A Deadly Tent Fire In Jordan Leaves Syrian Refugee Farmworkers In Despair

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With the coronavirus spreading, farms try to keep workers like these in Greenfield, Calif. safe through physical distancing and other measures but advocates for laborers say protections are often not adequate. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Mount Adams rises in the distance beyond the largely agricultural Yakima Valley, in Yakima, Wash. Elaine Thompson / AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson / AP

Washington Farmworkers Ask State Supreme Court For Overtime Pay

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Workers pick apples in a Wapato, Wash., orchard last October. U.S. farms employ hundreds of thousands of seasonal workers, mostly from Mexico, who enter the country on H-2A visas. The potential impact of the coronavirus on seasonal workers has the food industry on edge. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

COVID-19 Threatens Food Supply Chain As Farms Worry About Workers Falling Ill

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Charles Brain helps hand harvest grapes in a Shiraz vineyard in the Swartland wine region of South Africa. Lubanzi Wines, which was started by Brain and his partner, Walker Brown, earned its B Corp certification this year. Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines hide caption

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Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines

A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Worker Esperanza Yanez gives a cow a full physical. She says she's learned to spot a sick cow just by looking at it. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

Being in rural places means potential patients may often be isolated, low-income and not have easy access to transportation — and therefore difficult to serve. Christina Chung for NPR hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

In A Border Region Where Immigrants Are Wary, A Health Center Travels To Its Patients

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Luis Guerrero fills barrels with crushed grapes at Valley of the Moon winery in Sonoma, Calif., Oct 16, 2017. Guerrero says he's struggling to pay for rent after the wildfires forced the winery to close. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

At the Cathedral Ridge Winery in Hood River, Ore., smoke has poured into the property and there are worries it could alter the taste of the grapes. Molly Solomon/OPB hide caption

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Molly Solomon/OPB

Fallen fruit sits on the ground below orange trees in Frostproof, Fla., U.S. Hurricane Irma destroyed almost half of the citrus crop in some areas. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

A student uses notecards to learn facts about American government during a class at the public library in Brush, Colo. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Farmworker Maria Diaz works in the pepper fields of Dixon, Calif. Julia Mitric/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Julia Mitric/Capital Public Radio

Why California's New Farmworker Overtime Bill May Not Mean Bigger Paychecks

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Cesar Chavez, the head of the United Farm Workers Union, calls for the resignation of Walter Kintz, the first legal counsel for the state Agriculture Labor Relations Board, in Sacramento, Calif., on Sept. 16, 1975. Chavez's efforts in California culminated in landmark legislation that protected the rights of the state's farmworkers and created the ALRB. AP hide caption

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AP
Morgan McCloy/NPR

For Pickers, Blueberries Mean Easier Labor But More Upheaval

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Workers place the berries directly into the plastic clamshell packages that shoppers will find in stores. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

In Florida, Strawberry Fields Are Not Forever

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Contractors who supply workers to farmers say requirements of the Affordable Care Act and the immigration status of many of the workers create a Catch-22. Maguey Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Maguey Images/Getty Images

Farm Contractors Balk At Obamacare Requirements

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Migrant workers harvest strawberries at a farm near Oxnard, Calif. Ventura County is one of two counties where labor organizers hope to get a Bill of Rights passed to protect farm workers from abuse and wage theft. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images