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AquaBounty's salmon (rear) have been genetically modified to grow to market size in about half the time as a normal salmon — 16 to 18 months, rather than three years. MCT /Landov hide caption

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MCT /Landov

Genetically Modified Salmon Is Safe To Eat, FDA Says

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A bottle of Monsanto's Roundup herbicide in a gardening store in Lille, France. A group convened by the European Food Safety Agency reviewed the available scientific data on the chemical, also known as glyphosate, and concluded that it probably does not cause cancer. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Waiting in line for an exhibit at the Chipotle Cultivate Festival on factory farming. Festivalgoers had to visit four such exhibits to get a free burrito. Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media

'GMO-Free' Is A Boon For Companies Chasing 'Health Halo' Profits

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Now that's a big root: Sweet potatoes aren't tubers, or thickened stems, like potatoes. Sweet potatoes are roots — swollen and packed with starch. U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com hide caption

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U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com

Chipotle's announcement that it has removed all GMOs from its menu items is part of a growing food industry trend. From left: Nestle chocolates, Chipotle tortillas, Diet Pepsi, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner, a Subway sandwich. All of these companies have dropped ingredients over the past year in response to consumer demands. Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto

Arctic Granny (right), a GMO variety created by Okanagan Specialty Fruits, got the gren light from federal regulators Friday. The apple doesn't turn brown like a conventional Granny Smith apple (left). Okanagan Specialty Fruits hide caption

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Okanagan Specialty Fruits

GMO Apples Get The Nod, But Not Much Of A Welcoming Party

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A couple of male, genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes take flight. Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec hide caption

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Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec

Florida Health Officials Hope To Test GMO Mosquitoes This Spring

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Processing often degrades a GMO ingredient to the point of making its DNA – or anything else that's genetically modified, like proteins — undetectable in the finished product. That's the case, for example, with vegetable oils made from GMO canola or soybeans. Takao Onozato/Corbis hide caption

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Takao Onozato/Corbis

Scientists reprogrammed the common bacterium E. coli so it requires a synthetic amino acid to live. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Scientists Give Genetically Modified Organisms A Safety Switch

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