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Bob Scott, a weed scientist at the University of Arkansas, says he wishes more testing could have been done on the new dicamba formulations, but "the product was not made available to us." Dan Charles/ NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/ NPR

Monsanto Attacks Scientists After Studies Show Trouble For Weedkiller Dicamba

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Scientists have used a popular gene editing tool called CRISPR to snip out a tiny piece of DNA from one particular gene in a white button mushroom. The resulting mushroom doesn't brown when cut. Adam Fagen/Flickr hide caption

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Adam Fagen/Flickr

Amid GMO Strife, Food Industry Vies For Public Trust In CRISPR Technology

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Non-GMO labels, like this one at Whole Foods, may strengthen consumer perceptions that genetically modified foods may carry risks to health. Ordon Chibroski/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Ordon Chibroski/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Corn rootworm beetle larvae feed on maize root and seed. Nigel Cattlin/Science Source hide caption

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Nigel Cattlin/Science Source

As a GMO Pillar Wobbles, Biotech Companies Promise New Insect-Killing Genes

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A farmer sprays a soybean field in Granger, Iowa. There's new and detailed data on the impact of genetically modified crops on pesticide use. Those crops replaced insecticides, and, at first, some herbicides. But herbicide use has rebounded. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Non-GMO eggs. (this photo is for promo only, not for the page) Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

Organic Food Fights Back Against 'Non-GMO' Rival

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Congress has passed a bill that will require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP

Congress Just Passed A GMO Labeling Bill. Nobody's Super Happy About It

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The Senate on Thursday approved a measure that would require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the Senate bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP

Worker Javier Alcantar tends to crops at the Monsanto Co. test field in Woodland, Calif., in 2012. Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

GMOs Are Safe, But Don't Always Deliver On Promises, Top Scientists Say

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In the past two years, many food companies — including candy-makers — have decided to label their products as non-GMO. Because practically all sugar beets in the U.S. are genetically modified, those food products are now using sugar derived from sugar cane. There is no genetically modified sugar cane. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

As Big Candy Ditches GMOs, Sugar Beet Farmers Hit A Sour Patch

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A mockup of a possible GMO label on a can of Campbell's Spaghetti-Os, with these words: "Partially produced with genetic engineering." Unless Congress or a federal court intervene, Vermont's new GMO labeling law will go into effect in July. So some companies are scrambling to comply. Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company

How Little Vermont Got Big Food Companies To Label GMOs

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A mockup of a possible GMO label on a can of Campbell's Spaghetti-Os, with these words: "Partially produced with genetic engineering." Lawmakers are scrambling to piece together a national GMO labeling standard before July 1. Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company