GMOs GMOs

A corn purchaser writes on his account in northwest China in 2012. In November 2013, officials began rejecting imports of U.S. corn when they detected traces of a new gene not yet approved in China. Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov

General Mills' original Cheerios are now GMO-free. But you won't find a label on the box highlighting the change. David Duprey/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Duprey/AP

Some Food Companies Are Quietly Dumping GMO Ingredients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/333725880/333892224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A customer shops for produce at the Hunger Mountain Co-op in April 2013 in Montpelier, Vt. More than a dozen food cooperatives supported the bill that would require the labeling of genetically modified foods. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP

A woman shops at a supermarket in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Allen Williams grows corn and soybeans for Clarkson Grain, which has been selling GMO-free grain to Japan for years. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/269479079/271355343" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Soon after being sliced, a conventional Granny Smith apple (left) starts to brown, while a newly developed GM Granny Smith stays fresher looking. Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc.

This GMO Apple Won't Brown. Will That Sour The Fruit's Image?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/260782518/260879149" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Labels on bags of snack foods indicate they are non-GMO food products. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

So What Happens If The Movement To Label GMOs Succeeds?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/235525984/235671753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute