GMOs GMOs

Waiting in line for an exhibit at the Chipotle Cultivate Festival on factory farming. Festivalgoers had to visit four such exhibits to get a free burrito. Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media

'GMO-Free' Is A Boon For Companies Chasing 'Health Halo' Profits

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Now that's a big root: Sweet potatoes aren't tubers, or thickened stems, like potatoes. Sweet potatoes are roots — swollen and packed with starch. U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com hide caption

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U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com

Chipotle's announcement that it has removed all GMOs from its menu items is part of a growing food industry trend. From left: Nestle chocolates, Chipotle tortillas, Diet Pepsi, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner, a Subway sandwich. All of these companies have dropped ingredients over the past year in response to consumer demands. Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto

Arctic Granny (right), a GMO variety created by Okanagan Specialty Fruits, got the gren light from federal regulators Friday. The apple doesn't turn brown like a conventional Granny Smith apple (left). Okanagan Specialty Fruits hide caption

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Okanagan Specialty Fruits

GMO Apples Get The Nod, But Not Much Of A Welcoming Party

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A couple of male, genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes take flight. Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec hide caption

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Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec

Florida Health Officials Hope To Test GMO Mosquitoes This Spring

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Processing often degrades a GMO ingredient to the point of making its DNA – or anything else that's genetically modified, like proteins — undetectable in the finished product. That's the case, for example, with vegetable oils made from GMO canola or soybeans. Takao Onozato/Corbis hide caption

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Takao Onozato/Corbis

Scientists reprogrammed the common bacterium E. coli so it requires a synthetic amino acid to live. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Scientists Give Genetically Modified Organisms A Safety Switch

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

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Mattheos Koffas (left), a biochemical engineer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Andrew Jones, a graduate student in his lab, with a flask of microbe-produced antioxidants. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Who Made That Flavor? Maybe A Genetically Altered Microbe

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