Tesla Tesla

People look at cars at a Tesla showroom in New York City. Tesla CEO Elon Musk, reportedly under scrutiny by federal regulators for earlier statements, says Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund is looking to diversify away from oil with a bigger investment in the electric car company. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk is considering taking the company private, saying it would be less distracting that the "enormous pressure" of meeting quarterly financial targets. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

8 Years After Going Public, Elon Musk Wants To Take Tesla Private

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The interior of a Tesla Model X 75D semi-autonomous electric vehicle is shown in January 2017. The company's autopilot system has been engaged at the time of a number of accidents, including a crash that killed the driver in California in March, but the company emphasizes the system can't be relied on to prevent collisions. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

The driver of the Tesla Model S told police the car was in Autopilot mode as it rammed into a Utah fire department truck on May 11 in South Jordan, Utah. South Jordan Police Department via AP hide caption

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South Jordan Police Department via AP

Elon Musk speaks at the International Astronautical Congress on Sept. 29 in Adelaide, Australia. On Wednesday, the Tesla CEO took analysts and the media to task. Mark Brake/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Brake/Getty Images

Elon Musk To Analysts: Stop With The 'Boring, Bonehead Questions' On Tesla

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Companies such as Playboy and Space X have deleted their official Facebook pages amid the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The social media giant is losing more than just profiles: Its market value has decreased by $80 billion. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Warning signs adorn the fence surrounding the compound housing the Hornsdale Power Reserve, featuring the world's largest lithium ion battery made by Tesla, during the official launch near Jamestown, Australia, on Friday. David Gray/Reuters hide caption

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David Gray/Reuters

The new Tesla Model 3 is displayed at the 2017 LA Auto Show. The company has struggled to meet its goal of producing thousands of the vehicles per week. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Tesla Going At 'Warp Speed,' But Lags In Race To Produce Mass Market Electric Cars

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A vehicle sits in an acoustics testing lab at BYD headquarters in Shenzhen. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Chinese Electric Carmaker Aims To Become A Global Brand

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Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk speaks at the unveiling of the Model 3 in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 31, 2016. The first Model 3 is due to roll off the assembly line Friday. Justin Pritchard/AP hide caption

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Justin Pritchard/AP

As First Model 3 Rolls Off The Line, Can Tesla Sustain Momentum?

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