tea tea

Afternoon Tea, 1886. Chromolithograph after Kate Greenaway. If you're looking for finger sandwiches, dainty desserts and formality, afternoon tea is your cup. Print Collector/Getty Images hide caption

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Print Collector/Getty Images

Myanmar democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi (right) receives a bowl of green tea from Japanese tea master Genshitsu Sen at a tea ceremony in Kyoto during a 2013 visit to Japan. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

In the Blue Zone of Okinawa, Japan, locals drink green tea with jasmine flowers and turmeric called shan-pien, which translates to "tea with a bit of scent." David McLain/Courtesy of Blue Zones hide caption

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David McLain/Courtesy of Blue Zones

A Hindu servant serves tea to a European colonial woman in the early 20th century. The British habit of adding tea to sugar wasn't merely a matter of taste: It also helped steer the course of history. Underwood & Underwood/Corbis hide caption

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Underwood & Underwood/Corbis

An illustration from a book published in 1851 depicts the cultivation of tea in China. In the mid-19th century, China controlled the world's tea production. That soon changed, thanks to a botanist with a penchant for espionage. Internet Archive hide caption

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Internet Archive
Courtesy Freer Gallery of Art

Japanese Tea Ritual Turned 15th Century 'Tupperware' Into Art

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A pot of tea sits at the newly opened Teavana tea bar in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Can Starbucks Do For Tea What It Has Done For Coffee?

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Kombucha made by artisan tea brewer Bill Bond in Akron, Ohio, comes in an array of flavors, such as lemongrass, ginger, blueberry and watermelon. Peggy Turbett/The Plain Dealer /Landov hide caption

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Peggy Turbett/The Plain Dealer /Landov

Kombucha: Magical Health Elixir Or Just Funky Tea?

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What is a "tea blend?" Sasha/Courtesy of Adagio Teas hide caption

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Sasha/Courtesy of Adagio Teas

Tea a dangerous habit? Women have long made a ritual of it, but in 19th century Ireland, moral reformers tried to talk them out of it. At the time, tea was considered a luxury, and taking the time to drink it was an affront to the morals of frugality and restraint. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

The Emperor's Himalayan lavender tea is popular at Washington, D.C.'s Park Hyatt Tea Room, but please don't put milk in it. Courtesy of Park Hyatt hide caption

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Courtesy of Park Hyatt

Health Benefits Of Tea: Milking It Or Not

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