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Durga, now 22, was married in her northern Indian village at the age of 15. Her father forced her into the marriage. But he had a change of heart right after the wedding and refused to send her to her husband. After much careful diplomacy, he managed to dissolve the union. Swati Vashishtha for NPR hide caption

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Swati Vashishtha for NPR

It seems like every kid is online. But UNICEF's director of data, Laurence Chandy, observes: "It's a huge inequity between those who have access and those who do not." Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

This young boy was kidnapped by Boko Haram. He managed to escape, spent months in a government barracks and now lives in a rehabilitation center. He is probably around 6 years old but doesn't know for sure. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

The Little Boy Who Escaped From Boko Haram

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A World Food Programme worker stands next to aid parcels that will be distributed to South Sudanese refugees at the airport in Sudan's North Kordofan state. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Stop The World's Looming Famines

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Beyonce, pictured at the Grammy awards in February, returned to Twitter after a year's absence to announce a new philanthropic venture. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for NARAS hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for NARAS

People gather at the site of a suicide bomb attack at a market in June 2015 in Maiduguri, Nigeria, where two girls blew themselves up near a crowded mosque. Jossy Ola/AP hide caption

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Jossy Ola/AP

Violence in Syria killed more than 650 children last year, UNICEF says — a 20 percent increase from 2015. Here, Syrians return to their homes in Al Bab, after pro-Turkish militias took the town back from ISIS fighters. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Five-year-old Murtaza Ahmadi, an avid Lionel Messi fan from Afghanistan, poses in a signed jersey from the Argentinian soccer great on Feb. 26. The boy's father says the media coverage led to threats toward the family. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Young Nigerians draw an attack scene during a therapy program at a refugee camp in Chad for people displaced by the violent conflict with Boko Haram. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images

Boko Haram Abductees Face Tough Return

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The boys practice their kicks. Kiana Hayeri for NPR hide caption

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Kiana Hayeri for NPR

PHOTOS: Giving Ex-Child Soldiers A Chance To Be Kids Again

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In this November 2015 photo, A 17-year-old mother sits with her baby in the Inhassune village, in southern Mozambique. In Mozambique there are no laws preventing child marriages and existing child protection laws offer loopholes. If a community decides that a girl is to be married in a traditional ceremony, with or without her consent, lawmakers are powerless to intervene. Shiraaz Mohamed/AP hide caption

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Shiraaz Mohamed/AP