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Wells Fargo will pay a $2.09 billion civil penalty for allegedly selling residential mortgage loans that included misstated income information, the Justice Department said. Mario Anzuoni/Reuters hide caption

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Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is levying a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo as punishment for the banking giant's actions in its mortgage and auto loan businesses. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Fed restricted Wells Fargo's growth and called for the replacement of four board members following a widespread scandal that saw millions of fake accounts opened. CX Matiash/AP hide caption

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CX Matiash/AP

Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith testifies about the company's massive data breach before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Wells Fargo Bank branch office in San Francisco. The bank acknowledges it signed up nearly 500,000 auto-loan customers for insurance they didn't need. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Who Snatched My Car? Wells Fargo Did

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John Stumpf, the former chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, will repay $28 million to the bank over an improper sales practices scandal. He's seen here visiting the House Financial Services Committee last September. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

OSHA says a manager's report of suspected fraudulent activity was at least partly responsible for his firing. Here, pedestrians pass in front of a Wells Fargo bank branch in New York earlier this year. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Olivia One Feather (center) of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe holds up her fist after the Seattle City Council voted Tuesday to divest from Wells Fargo over its role as a lender to the Dakota Access Pipeline project. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Sen. Elizabeth Warren questions John Stumpf, then CEO of Wells Fargo, during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Sept. 20. Pete Marovic/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovic/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senators Investigate Reports Wells Fargo Punished Workers

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In the ongoing scandal engulfing Wells Fargo, the bank says it fired wrongdoers. But some workers say they were trying to blow the whistle and Wells Fargo fired them. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Workers Say Wells Fargo Unfairly Scarred Their Careers

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Workers wash a window at a Samsung shop in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday as the corporation works out how to clean up its sullied reputation. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

The entrance to Wells Fargo Headquarters on California Street in San Francisco. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Former Wells Fargo Employees Describe Toxic Sales Culture, Even At HQ

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