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Roads and infrastructure are increasing being overwhelmed by heavier rainfall, like the California Central Valley town of Planada in January. Most states still aren't designing water systems for heavier storms. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Federal climate forecasts could help prepare for extreme rain. But it's years away

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Hurricane Ian caused $112.9 billion dollars and more than 150 deaths when it slammed into south Florida in 2022, making it the costliest climate-fueled disaster in the U.S. last year. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Extreme weather, fueled by climate change, cost the U.S. $165 billion in 2022

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An iceberg in Ilulissat, Greenland. Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are melting rapidly, and that melt will accelerate as the Earth heats up. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

An aerial view of the coastline on Dec. 07, 2019 in Port Vila, Vanuatu. Satellite data show sea level has risen about 6mm per year around Vanuatu since 1993, a rate nearly twice the global average, while temperatures have been increasing since 1950. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Guitard/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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Heavy rain from the remnants of Hurricane Ida flooded roads and expressways in New York in 2021. In a hotter climate, rainstorms are becoming more intense. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Chief Geoffrey Deibler and dispatchers Meghan Collier (center) and Bobbie Brown of the Morganfield Police Department traveled to nearby Dawson Springs, Ky., to help look for survivors. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

Kentucky crews search painstakingly for 109 people missing after deadly tornadoes

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Smoke from the Bond Fire billows above Peltzer Pines Christmas tree farm in Orange County, Calif., on Dec. 3, 2020. Extreme weather and supply chain issues could make Christmas trees harder to come by this holiday season. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Why Christmas trees may be harder to find this year (and what you can do about it)

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Flames from the Windy Fire burn up a giant tree this month in the Trail of 100 Giants grove in Sequoia National Forest in California. Children in younger generations will experience two to seven times more extreme climate events such as wildfires, a new study says. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Jason Forthofer, mechanical engineer at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory, looks into a fire whirl he generated to demonstrate how fire whirls and fire tornadoes form in wildland fires. Erica Zurek/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Erica Zurek/Montana Public Radio

Scientists Are Learning More About Fire Tornadoes, The Spinning Funnels Of Flame

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Steam and exhaust rise from the steel power station HKM Huettenwerke Krupp Mannesmann GmbH on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Duisburg, Germany. Climate scientists reports that greenhouse gases are among the chief causes of global warming and climates change. Lukas Schulze/Getty Images hide caption

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Lukas Schulze/Getty Images

Three (Hopeful!) Takeaways From The UN's Climate Change Report

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The remains of a burned home are seen in the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 26, 2021. Extreme weather events have claimed hundreds of lives worldwide in recent weeks, and upcoming forecasts for wildfire and hurricane seasons are dire. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Volunteers fight a wildfire in northeastern Siberia on July 17th. Heat waves in the Russian Arctic and boreal forests have fueled intense, widespread blazes that can damage trees and release enormous amounts of stored carbon dioxide from forests and permafrost. Ivan Nikiforov/AP hide caption

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Ivan Nikiforov/AP

Climate Scientists Meet As Floods, Fires, Droughts And Heat Waves Batter Countries

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Electrical grid transmission towers in Pasadena, Calif. Major power outages from extreme weather have risen dramatically in the past two decades. John Antczak/AP hide caption

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John Antczak/AP

It's Not Just Texas. The Entire Energy Grid Needs An Upgrade For Extreme Weather

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A 130 degree temperature was recorded Sunday in Death Valley National Park, Calif. Now a committee of scientists is working to verify this temperature, which might turn out to be one of the hottest ever recorded. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Children play around trees downed by Cyclone Idai at the Guara Guara resettlement site in Mozambique, where thousands of people are still living more than nine months after the storm. NicholeSobecki/VII for NPR hide caption

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NicholeSobecki/VII for NPR

Mozambique Is Racing To Adapt To Climate Change. The Weather Is Winning

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Herders bury animal carcasses in 2010 in Mongolia's Dundgovi province. A decade ago, an extreme winter — known in Mongolia as a dzud — claimed the lives of 22% of the nation's livestock and sped up migration from rural areas to urban centers. Jargal Byambasuren/Reuters hide caption

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Jargal Byambasuren/Reuters

The Deadly Winters That Have Transformed Life For Herders In Mongolia

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A woman uses a portable fan to cool herself in Tokyo on Tuesday as Japan suffers from a heat wave. Scientists say extreme weather events will likely happen more often as the planet gets warmer. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

When The Weather Is Extreme, Is Climate Change To Blame?

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