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The measles virus is highly contagious. If someone with measles coughs or sneezes, the virus in those droplets can survive for two hours afterward — infecting about 90% of the people lacking immunity who pass through that space. Erik Witsoe/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Erik Witsoe/EyeEm/Getty Images

Millennial And Gen-X Travelers: Need Another Measles Shot?

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Many people might not be aware of what types of vaccines they need as they get older. Here, an adult gets a flu shot in Jacksonville, Fla. Rick Wilson/AP images for Flu + You hide caption

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Rick Wilson/AP images for Flu + You

MMR — the modern combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella — provides stronger, longer-lasting protection against measles than the stand-alone measles vaccine typically given in the U.S. in the early 1960s. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too

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The Washington state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would remove the personal belief exemption from the required vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella. Here, people protest the related house bill outside Washington's Legislative Building in Olympia in February. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Dr. Eric Ball examines a healthy 5-day-old patient in his office in Ladera Ranch, Calif. Ball and colleagues decided this week to take only patients whose parents follow the recommended vaccine schedule. Courtesy of Eric Ball hide caption

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Courtesy of Eric Ball

Pediatricians Pressured To Drop Parents Who Won't Vaccinate

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Helen Down holds her 14-month-old daughter, Amelia, for an MMR shot in Swansea, Wales, April 2013. The vaccination was in response to a measles outbreak. Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images

Public school student Julio Valenzuela, 11, grimaces as he gets a vaccination before the start of the school in Lynnwood, Calif., on Aug. 27. Vaccines are required for school attendance. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Each dot represents one case of mumps between late June 2009 and late June 2010. The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Two boys study together at a Chicago yeshiva in 2009. Public health officials say this type of close physical contact caused a mumps outbreak to spread throughout several orthodox Jewish communities in and around New York City. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP