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A sign for Flu Shots at a CVS Pharmacy in Boston. Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images

Opinion: We Are Risking Health And Life

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Measles used to be a common childhood disease, but after an effective vaccine was developed, the disease was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. This year's outbreaks, however, put that status in jeopardy. solidcolours/Getty Images hide caption

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solidcolours/Getty Images

The Washington state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would remove the personal belief exemption from the required vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella. Here, people protest the related house bill outside Washington's Legislative Building in Olympia in February. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Thirty-three-year-old mother Kim Nelson started a vaccine advocacy group in Greenville, S.C., to help reach vaccine-hesitant families. Here, she prepares vaccine information flyers for public school students. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

A Parent-To-Parent Campaign To Get Vaccine Rates Up

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How One Woman Is Working To Educate Parents On Vaccinations

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Hesitancy about vaccination in a community has a lot to do with acculturation to its norms. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Medical Anthropologist Explores 'Vaccine Hesitancy'

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Amber Gorrow and her daughter, Eleanor, 3, pick out a show to watch after Eleanor's nap at their home in Vancouver, Wash., on Wednesday. Eleanor has gotten her first measles vaccine, but Gorrow's son, Leon, 8 weeks, is still too young to be immunized. Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images

Measles Cases Mount In Pacific Northwest Outbreak

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A measles outbreak in Washington state has triggered a state of emergency. In Clark County, where 35 cases have been reported, 31 were not immunized. Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images

As history tells it, young Edward Jenner heard a milkmaid brag that having cowpox made her immune to smallpox. And years later, as a doctor, he drew matter from a cowpox pustule on the arm of a milkmaid to vaccinate a young test subject (depicted in the drawing above). A researcher now weighs in on the veracity of the milkmaid stories. The New York Academy of Medicine Library (nyamcenterforhistory.org) hide caption

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The New York Academy of Medicine Library (nyamcenterforhistory.org)

A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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By mid-January, there had been nearly 5,000 reported cases of diphtheria in the camps and 33 deaths. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Rare Disease Finds Fertile Ground In Rohingya Refugee Camps

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As flu cases mount in California, the state's health department recommends vaccination for all people 6 months and older. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images