vaccination vaccination

As history tells it, young Edward Jenner heard a milkmaid brag that having cowpox made her immune to smallpox. And years later, as a doctor, he drew matter from a cowpox pustule on the arm of a milkmaid to vaccinate a young test subject (depicted in the drawing above). A researcher now weighs in on the veracity of the milkmaid stories. The New York Academy of Medicine Library (nyamcenterforhistory.org) hide caption

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The New York Academy of Medicine Library (nyamcenterforhistory.org)

A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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By mid-January, there had been nearly 5,000 reported cases of diphtheria in the camps and 33 deaths. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Rare Disease Finds Fertile Ground In Rohingya Refugee Camps

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As flu cases mount in California, the state's health department recommends vaccination for all people 6 months and older. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

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The microneedle patches developed at Georgia Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Drug Delivery each contain an array of needles less than a millimeter long. Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology hide caption

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Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

Khadra Abdulle, a resident of St. Paul, stops to shop at the Riverside Market in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis. It's the inaccurate information about a link between vaccines and autism, she says, that's keeping some well-meaning parents from getting their kids vaccinated against measles. Mark Zdechlik/MPR hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR

Unfounded Autism Fears Are Fueling Minnesota's Measles Outbreak

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Researchers used online data to model the vaccination rate in communities affected by an outbreak of mumps in Arkansas. Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR hide caption

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Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR

When Georgia Moore (second from left) was diagnosed with leukemia in 2010, her parents, Trevor and Courtney Moore, worried about the germs her younger sister, Ivy, would bring home from school. Courtesy of the Moore family/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtesy of the Moore family/Kaiser Health News