oyster farming oyster farming

Oyster farmer and scientist Lisa Calvo leads a team of women that harvests oysters along the New Jersey coast. Calvo says she is inspired by the tenacity, skill and grit of women now coming into the industry. Jenn Hall/NPR hide caption

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Jenn Hall/NPR

The Zirlott family's oyster farm is at the end of a long pier in Sandy Bay. Legend has it that the name "Murder Point" comes from a deadly dispute over an oyster lease at this site back in 1929. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

7 Years After BP Oil Spill, Oyster Farming Takes Hold In South

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As the wild oyster population resurges, there is an added bonus — our waterways are getting cleaner. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

The Oyster's Mighty Comeback Is Creating Cleaner U.S. Waterways

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A plate of Sweet Jesus oysters grown in Chesapeake Bay by Hollywood Oyster Co. in Hollywood, Md. Katy Adams/Courtesy Clyde's Restaurant Group hide caption

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Katy Adams/Courtesy Clyde's Restaurant Group

What they pull up is discouraging. Normally, 30 seconds under water would bring up a cage full of mostly healthy oysters. This time, Jimmy Bloom pulls up a cage that is barely one-third full. And it's haul is a mix of broken, chipped, meatless oysters. Jeff Cohen for NPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen for NPR