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Amber Guyger, the former Dallas police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man in his own home told a 911 dispatcher, "I thought it was my apartment" several times as she waited for emergency responders to arrive. Guyger is charged in the September, 2018 killing of Botham Jean. Mesquite Police Department via AP hide caption

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Mesquite Police Department via AP

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger fatally shot an unarmed black neighbor whose apartment she said she entered by mistake, believing it to be her own. AP hide caption

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AP

Jury Selection Begins For Ex-Dallas Police Officer Who Shot Man In His Own Home

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The engine on a Southwest Airlines plane is inspected as it sits on the runway at the Philadelphia International Airport after making an emergency landing there on Tuesday. Amanda Bourman/AP hide caption

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Amanda Bourman/AP
Cornelia Li for NPR

With Thousands Of Homeless Students, This District Put Help Right In Its Schools

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Trainees participate in a tactical defense class at the Dallas Police Basic Training Academy. The officer deaths in July strengthened the camaraderie among recruits training at the academy. Yvonne Muther/NPR hide caption

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Yvonne Muther/NPR

Police keep watch during a protest Friday in Dallas. Ron Jenkins/AP hide caption

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Ron Jenkins/AP

Dallas Police Recruitment Call Answered, But Pay Issues Are A Concern

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Micah Johnson, who authorities have identified as the shooter who killed five law enforcement officers in Dallas on July 7 during a protest over recent fatal police shootings of black men. AP hide caption

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AP
Meriel Jane Waissman/Getty Images

'I'm Petrified For My Children': Will Racism And Guns Lead To America's Ruin?

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The annual Chicago Fraternal Order of Police summer picnic for city cops and their families. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Many Cops Under Tremendous Stress After High-Profile Killings

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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