U.K. U.K.

A 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Trump as a cartoon baby stands inflated in London's Bingfield Park. It will hover above Parliament Square later this week during the president's visit. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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'We Need To Take A Stand': U.K. Protesters Mobilize For Trump's Visit

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The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission's chief commissioner, Les Allamby, speaks to members of the media outside of the Supreme Court in London on Thursday. The court said it could not rule on the commissions' challenge to Northern Ireland's strict abortion laws, but that it would have declared them incompatible with human rights laws otherwise. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators gather in Dublin on Saturday, awaiting the final results of Ireland's referendum on abortion. Ultimately, Irish voters backed repeal of the ban — but, as evidenced by their signs, those in favor of repeal were already thinking of what may happen next in Northern Ireland. Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle greet tourists from the glossy surface of a postcard sold Friday in Windsor. The pair — the real people, not their images, we mean — will wed at St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle on Saturday. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Britain's Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt arrives at 10 Downing Street in central London on March 13. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Home Secretary Amber Rudd attends the official unveiling of a statue in honor of the first female Suffragist Millicent Fawcett in Parliament Square last week in London. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory in Porton Down, U.K., seen last month. Researchers at the lab were tasked with testing the nerve agent used to poison Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in early March. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

A small crowd gathered outside the Russian Embassy in London on Tuesday, as the nearly two dozen Russian diplomats returned to their country under a mandate from the British government. The U.K. expelled the diplomats in retaliation for the spy poisoning case earlier this month. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

European Union chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier (right) and British Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union David Davis announced their progress Monday at EU headquarters in Brussels on Monday. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

Police officers stand guard near a forensics tent in a Sainsbury's parking lot on Tuesday, as investigations continue more than a week after the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury, England. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Military personnel wearing protective suits investigate the poisoning of Sergei Skripal in Salisbury, England. Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, remain critically ill. Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Military forces continue investigations Monday into the nerve agent poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia. U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May says it is "highly likely" that it was carried out by Russia. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Military personnel outside Bourne Hill police station in Salisbury, England, Sunday, as police and members of the armed forces probe last week's suspected nerve agent attack on Russian double agent spy Sergei Skripal. Andrew Matthews/AP hide caption

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Andrew Matthews/AP

Protesters marched in London on Feb. 3 to demand more money for Britain's National Health Service, as winter conditions are thought to have put a severe strain on the system. Yui Mok/AP hide caption

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Yui Mok/AP

U.K. Hospitals Are Overburdened, But The British Love Their Universal Health Care

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Migrants carrying sticks march in the streets of Calais, northern France, on Thursday. French authorities say four migrants have been shot in the northern port city of Calais in a confrontation that police tried to stop. AP hide caption

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Britain must accept all EU laws during a post-Brexit transition period, including those made after it leaves, says European Union Chief Negotiator Michel Barnier, under rules issued to him by the other European Union countries. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP/Getty Images