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schizophrenia

Scientists have built an enormous atlas of the human brain that could help them chart a path toward preventing and treating many different neurological disorders. Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images hide caption

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Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images

Scientists built the largest-ever map of the human brain. Here's what they found

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New research probes the relationship between certain genes and brain disorders like autism and schizophrenia. Jill George / NIH hide caption

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Jill George / NIH

Brain cells, interrupted: How some genes may cause autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia

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Barbara Romero and her son Daniel. Barbara Romero hide caption

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Barbara Romero

A mother's understanding of her son is transformed with a single phone call

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This cross-section of a rat brain shows tissue from a human brain organoid fluorescing in light green. Scientists say these implanted clusters of human neurons could aid the study of brain disorders. Pasca lab / Stanford Medicine hide caption

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Pasca lab / Stanford Medicine

Human cells in a rat's brain could shed light on autism and ADHD

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Liz Kirkaldie says her grandson's marijuana use led to his schizophrenia diagnosis. She says she's skeptical the labels will work, "But if it helps even one person? Great." Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

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Beth LaBerge/KQED

California may require labels on pot products to warn of mental health risks

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New research finds that previous studies of mental illness using brain scans may be too small for the results to be reliable. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Image Source

A study of mice that hear imaginary sounds could help explain human disorders like schizophrenia, which produce hallucinations. D-Keine/Getty Images hide caption

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D-Keine/Getty Images

Mice That Hear Imaginary Sounds May Help Explain Hallucinations In People

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Hidden Valley Road: Inside the Mind of an American Family, by Robert Kolker NPR hide caption

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NPR

In 'Hidden Valley Road,' A Family's Journey Helps Shift The Science Of Mental Illness

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José's son, who has schizophrenia, recently got into a fight that resulted in a broken window — an out-of-control moment from his struggle with mental illness. And it could increase his chances of deportation to a country where mental health care is even more elusive. Hokyoung Kim for NPR hide caption

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR

A Young Immigrant Has Mental Illness, And That's Raising His Risk of Being Deported

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Psychiatry's shift toward seeing mental health problems as an illness to be treated with a pill hasn't always served patients well, says Harvard historian and author Anne Harrington. James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images hide caption

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James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images

A major study published Monday finds that widely prescribed antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol are no more effective than a placebo for treating delirium. Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images hide caption

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Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium

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Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

An average of 13,776 inmates in 45 California counties were on psychotropic medications in 2016-2017, a recent report found. That is up from 10,999 five years ago. erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images hide caption

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erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images

The scientists tested tissue samples from the brains of deceased patients who had from autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF hide caption

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Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF

Major Neurological Conditions Have More In Common Than We Thought, Study Finds

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A provision in the bill proposed by the GOP Senate would permit Medicaid to pay for longer stints of inpatient psychiatric care. But other parts of the bill would strip $772 billion from Medicaid — the single-largest funder of care for people who have schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or another serious mental illness. B. Boissonnet/Getty Images hide caption

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B. Boissonnet/Getty Images
Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Father Of 2 Sons With Schizophrenia Talks Of His Struggle To Save Them

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This image is from lab-grown brain tissue — a minibrain — infected by Zika virus (white) with neural stem cells in red and neuronal nuclei in green. Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming hide caption

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Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming

'Minibrains' Could Help Drug Discovery For Zika And For Alzheimer's

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Rachel Star Withers says that talking about her schizophrenia on YouTube has helped her. Some people who see the videos say the videos help them, too. Nii Ofoli Yartey/Courtesy of Rachel Star Withers hide caption

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Nii Ofoli Yartey/Courtesy of Rachel Star Withers

How YouTube Videos Help People Cope With Mental Illness

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A woman speaks at a support group for residents of a community in Bong County, Liberia, who are suffering the psychological aftermath of the Ebola crisis. International Medical Corps set up the group to complement the medical services it has offered to patients. Crystal Wells/International Medical Corps hide caption

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Crystal Wells/International Medical Corps