Shinzo Abe Shinzo Abe

Japanese Prime Minister and ruling party president Shinzo Abe smiles after the general election Sunday in Tokyo in which his ruling party won a clear majority. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Japan's Prime Minister Isn't Popular, But His Coalition Won A Supermajority

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Shinzo Abe, Japan's prime minister and president of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), center, raises his arm during an election campaign rally in Tokyo, on Saturday. Exit polls show the LDP winning a majority of parliament seats in Sunday's election. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People watch a TV news program showing a file image of a previous missile launch conducted by North Korea at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul. North Korea on Sunday test-launched a ballistic missile that landed in the Sea of Japan, the South Korean, Japanese and U.S. militaries said. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Yasunori Kagoike (center) head of an ultra-nationalistic Japanese school operator, walks through the hallway after testifying before an upper house panel at the parliament in Tokyo on March 23. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Land Deal For Right-Wing Elementary School Plagues Japanese Prime Minister

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Vice President Pence and Japanese Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Taro Aso leave the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo on Tuesday. Pence said the U.S. and Japan had launched talks that could eventually result in a bilateral trade deal between the two economies. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe arrives to speak to reporters following a meeting with Donald Trump in November. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In Talks With Trump, Japan's Shinzo Abe Will Seek To Smooth Economic Tensions

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President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office on Saturday. It was one of five calls with foreign leaders Trump had scheduled for the day. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Bubbles float over visitors during a New Year's Eve celebration event a Tokyo hotel. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe gave a speech at Pearl Harbor about the power of reconciliation in the waning days of 2016. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

Local television news displays Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaking to reporters at his official residence in Tokyo on Monday, as he announced he will become the first Japanese prime minister to visit Pearl Harbor. JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte attends a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (not pictured) at the prime minister's office in Tokyo on Wednesday. Duterte made a pitch for enhanced economic ties with Japan. Eugene Hoshiko/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AFP/Getty Images

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plays with children as he inspects a day care center in Yokohama in 2013. More than 20,000 Japanese children are on wait lists for day care. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Reuters/Landov

Will More Day Care Help Boost Japan's Sluggish Economy?

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Demonstrators rally against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's controversial security bills in front of the National Diet in Tokyo in September. The bills, which passed, will allow Japan to send its troops overseas for the first time since World War II. However, the likelihood of Japanese involvement in a foreign war appears quite small. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

Japan Can Now Send Its Military Abroad, But Will It?

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A young woman holds a placard protesting against controversial military reform bills outside Japan's parliament in Tokyo, Japan, on Friday. Lawmakers passed two measures to expand the role of Japan's military for the first time since World War II. Franck Robichon/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Franck Robichon/EPA/Landov

Japan's Emperor Akihito delivers his remarks with Empress Michiko during a memorial service at Nippon Budokan martial arts hall in Tokyo, on Saturday. His expression of "deep remorse" for Japan's wartime past is seen as an unprecedented apology. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

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Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows after delivering an address marking the 70th anniversary of World War II's end for his country. Abe noted Japan's continued grief over the war, but he also said future generations shouldn't be compelled to apologize for the war. Toru Hanai/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Toru Hanai/Reuters /Landov

A man pushes a loaded bicycle down a cleared path in a flattened area of Nagasaki more than a month after the nuclear attack in 1945. Stanley Troutman/AP hide caption

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Stanley Troutman/AP

Remembering The Horror Of Nagasaki 70 Years Later

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James Murphy, World War II veteran and prisoner of war, was photographed at his home in Santa Maria, Calif., on Thursday. Murphy received an apology from a senior Mitsubishi executive for being forced to work in the company's mines during the war. Michael A. Mariant/AP hide caption

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Michael A. Mariant/AP

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe

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Lumberjack Yukiko Koyama cuts pine trees on a hillside overlooking Matsumoto City in Nagano prefecture on Japan's central Honshu island. Koyama's employment at a local timber mill is partially subsidized by a government program to get more Japanese women into the workforce. Yo Nagaya/NPR hide caption

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Yo Nagaya/NPR

Is 'Womenomics' The Answer To Japan's Economic Woes?

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