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genetic testing

Shara and Robert Watkins hold their 5-month-old daughter, Kaiya, in their home in San Mateo, Calif., just after she had woken up from an afternoon nap. Lindsey Moore/KQED hide caption

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Lindsey Moore/KQED

Prenatal Testing Can Ease Minds Or Heighten Anxieties

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The results of genetic testing — whether done for health reasons or ancestry searches — can be used by insurance underwriters in evaluating an application for life insurance, or a disability or long-term-care policy. Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images

Jose and Elaine Belardo's lives were upended last year when he was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

How Soon Is Soon Enough To Learn You Have Alzheimer's?

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Rita Steyn has a family history of cancer so she ordered a home genetic testing kit to see if she carried certain genetic mutations that increase the risk for the disease. Courtesy of Rita Steyn hide caption

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Courtesy of Rita Steyn

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

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CRISPR and other gene technology is exciting, but shouldn't be seen as a panacea for treating illness linked to genetic mutations, says science columnist and author Carl Zimmer. It's still early days for the clinical applications of research. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

A Science Writer Explores The 'Perversions And Potential' Of Genetic Tests

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A sample of saliva can unlock details about a person's genetic makeup. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

POLL: Genealogical Curiosity Is A Top Reason For DNA Tests; Privacy A Concern

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DNA isolated from a small sample of saliva or blood can yield information, fairly inexpensively, about a person's relative risk of developing dozens of diseases or medical conditions. GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images

As mother and daughter, Carmen and Gisele Grayson thought their DNA ancestry tests would be very similar. Boy were they surprised. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

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Kerri De Nies plays with her son, Gregory Mac Phee at their home in San Diego. Gregory tested positive for adrenoleukodystrophy, a rare brain disorder that affects 1 in about 18,000 babies. Roughly 30 percent of boys with the genetic mutation go on to develop the most serious form of the disease. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Parents Lobby States To Expand Newborn Screening Test For Rare Brain Disorder

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Patients who underwent genetic screenings now fear that documentation of the results in their medical records could lead to problems if a new health law is enacted. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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Results from different genetic tests on samples from the same cancer patient can disagree about the best course of treatment. Clare McLean/University of Washington School of Medicine hide caption

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Clare McLean/University of Washington School of Medicine