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G-7 nations pledged millions to help Amazon countries fight wildfires, but Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said Tuesday that he's not interested unless he gets an apology from French President Emmanuel Macron. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazil Rejects G-7's Offer Of $22 Million To Fight Amazon Fires

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Indigenous people protest in defense of the Amazon in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday. Experts from the country's satellite monitoring agency say most of the fires are set by farmers or ranchers clearing existing farmland, but the same monitoring agency has reported a sharp increase in deforestation this year as well. Bruna Prado/AP hide caption

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Bruna Prado/AP

Moacir Cordeiro, who works in a local cattle farm, looks on after digging grooves with a tractor in an attempt to stave off fires in the Alvorada da Amazonia region in Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil, on Sunday. Leo Correa/AP hide caption

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Leo Correa/AP

Several of the fires burning in the Amazon rainforest can be seen even from space, as evidenced by this satellite image provided by NASA this month. Brazil's National Institute for Space Research said the country has seen a record number of wildfires this year. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

A couple watches boats pass the docks in Manaus, a city on the Amazon River. Pop-up restaurants like this line the docks to dish homemade Brazilian fare to ship travelers and crews. Catherine Osborn for NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn for NPR

A Day In The Boat Life On The Amazon River

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A deforested area of the Amazon rainforest in Para state, Brazil, in August. On Monday, the Brazilian government reversed its decision to open the National Reserve of Copper and Associates, which rests across Para and Amapa states. Nacho Doce/Reuters hide caption

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

Ivo Cassol is a prominent Brazilian senator from the western state of Rondonia in the Amazon. He made his fortune in timber and cattle ranching. Environmentalists say these activities are responsible for much of the deforestation in the rain forest. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

The Amazon, As It Looks To A Man Who Made His Fortune There

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Sunset colors cut through the smoky haze in the Brazilian Amazon. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Scientists Say The Amazon Is Still Teaching Us New Lessons

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Shaman Davi Kopenawa Yanomami is an advocate for his people and president of the Hutukara Yanomami Association. Fiona Watson/Survival International hide caption

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Fiona Watson/Survival International

Aotus lemurinus, a type of owl monkey also referred to as the gray-bellied night monkey, seen here at the Santa Fe Zoo, in Medellin, Colombia. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

A truck carrying hardwood timber drives along a rural road leading to Paragominas, Brazil, on Sept. 23, 2011. The city has become a pioneering "Green City," a model of sustainability with a new economic approach that has seen illegal deforestation virtually halted. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP