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Journalists wearing face masks — in an effort to protect against the coronavirus — gather for a news conference earlier this year in Beijing. Early Wednesday, China said it was planning to pull the press credentials of certain journalists employed by a handful of major U.S.-based newspapers. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

A protester shows a placard to travelers at Hong Kong International Airport on Wednesday. Flight operations resumed at the airport Wednesday morning after two days of disruptions. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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Vincent Thian/AP

The front page of the Communist Party's flagship newspaper the People's Daily (center) and other papers are seen one day after the unveiling of the new Politburo Standing Committee in Beijing last year. Thomas Peter/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Peter/Reuters

Chinese Leaders Leverage Media To Shape How The World Perceives China

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China's President Xi Jinping (center back) walks to his seat as he arrives at the opening ceremony of the annual Boao Forum in Boao, in southern China's Hainan province, on Sunday. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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Alexander F. Yuan/AP

Before it disappeared from the Web: Here's how People's Daily Online packaged its coverage of the "news" that Kim Jong Un is 2012's sexiest man. People's Daily Online (frame grab of a page that has now been removed) hide caption

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People's Daily Online (frame grab of a page that has now been removed)