Guatemala Guatemala

Residents search for victims of the Fuego volcano eruption in the ash-covered village of San Miguel Los Lotes, in Escuintla, about 20 miles southwest of Guatemala City, on Thursday. Johan Ordonez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez /AFP/Getty Images

Lilian Hernandez cries as she is comforted by her husband at the Mormon church that has been enabled as a shelter near Escuintla, Guatemala, on Tuesday. Hernandez lost 36 family members in all, missing and presumed dead in the town of San Miguel Los Lotes after the fiery volcanic eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, in south-central Guatemala. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

People flee El Rodeo village, less than 30 miles from the capital, Guatemala City, after the eruption of the Fuego volcano on Sunday. Noe Perez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noe Perez/AFP/Getty Images

'Everything Is A Disaster': Guatemala's Fuego Volcano Erupts, Killing At Least 69

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales, flanked by their wives, cut the ribbon during a ceremony Wednesday inaugurating the Guatemalan Embassy in Jerusalem. Ronen Zvulun/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronen Zvulun/AFP/Getty Images

A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

The Acatenango volcano is near the village of San Jose Calderas, many of whose residents were deported from a meatpacking plant in Iowa in 2008. Alice Fordham for NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham for NPR

How A Guatemalan Village's Fortunes Rose And Fell With U.S. Migration And Deportation

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A man walks beside posters with photos showing portraits of missing people, during a march to remember those who disappeared during the Guatemalan civil war, at the Plaza de la Constitution in Guatemala City on June 30, 2016. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Immigrant Accused Of Guatemalan War Crimes May Be Deported

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A LiDAR image from Tikal, the most important Maya city. PACUNAM/Marcello Canuto & Luke Auld-Thomas hide caption

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PACUNAM/Marcello Canuto & Luke Auld-Thomas

'Game Changer': Maya Cities Unearthed In Guatemala Forest Using Lasers

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Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales addresses the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 19, 2017, at the United Nations headquarters. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

A barista at El Injerto coffee shop in Guatemala City pours water into a chemex. Guatemala has long been known for its coffee, but a culture of artisanal coffee has only recently taken root here. Anna-Catherine Brigida hide caption

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Anna-Catherine Brigida

Relatives gather outside the Virgin of the Assumption Safe House near Guatemala City, Guatemala. Dozens of girls died after a fire broke out at the youth shelter on Wednesday. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images

Indigenous people attend the trial of two army officers accused of keeping Mayan Indian women as sex slaves during Guatemala's 36-year civil war. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images

Mayan Women Accuse Military Officials Of Holding Them As Sex Slaves

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Traditional Mayan figures made by artisan Nicolas Chavez in Guatemala and sold on Novica's website. Christopher Noey hide caption

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Christopher Noey

A Site Where Traditional Artisans Can Sell Their Works To The World

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