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FILE - A protestor holds a sign during a Students Demand Action event, near the U.S. Capitol, Monday, June 6, 2022, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Poll: Most Americans say curbing gun violence is more important than gun rights

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West Virginia's legislature has passed a bill that would allow concealed carry of firearms on public college campuses, including West Virginia University (pictured here). Ray Thompson/AP hide caption

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Ray Thompson/AP

A bump stock is displayed on March 15, 2019, in Harrisonburg, Va. A Trump administration ban on bump stocks, devices that enable a shooter to rapidly fire multiple rounds from semi-automatic weapons after an initial trigger pull, was struck down Friday by a federal appeals court in New Orleans. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Mementos decorate a makeshift memorial to shooting victims outside of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

The Uvalde shooting shows that gun laws do matter, says official who worked on report

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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, with government officials and gun control advocates, speaks at a news conference on May 30 about firearm-control legislation that was tabled in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Blair Gable/Reuters hide caption

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Blair Gable/Reuters

As gun violence rises in Canada, weapons from the U.S. complicate gun control efforts

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks during a ceremony to sign a package of bills to strengthen gun laws on June 6, 2022, in New York. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Shooting range owner John Deloca fires his pistol at his range in Queens, N.Y. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Most gun owners favor modest restrictions but deeply distrust government, poll finds

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Vice President Kamala Harris hugs Highland Park, Ill., Mayor Nancy Rotering on Tuesday as she visits the site of a shooting Monday that killed seven people. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, seen here speaking during a news conference after a Senate Republican lunch meeting on June 7, 2022, said he will support a gun bill in the Senate if it sticks to the proposed framework announced over the weekend. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Neighbors Richard Small (left), a Republican and longtime NRA member, and Gerardo Marquez, a gun owner and Democrat, both support measures to prevent gun violence. Marina Small for NPR hide caption

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Marina Small for NPR

Many gun owners support gun control. So why don't they speak out?

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Bullet cases are seen on the ground at a crime scene after Mexico City's Public Security Secretary Omar García Harfuch was wounded in an attack, in Mexico City, on June 26, 2020. Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson speaks at a campaign rally at a gun store in October in Lee's Summit, Mo. Parson has signed into law a measure that could fine state and local law enforcement officers $50,000 for helping to enforce federal gun laws. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

New York police Sgt. Damon Martin in the 75th Precinct field intelligence office, where the walls are covered with photos of seized illegal guns. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Does New York City Need Gun Control?

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Supporters of gun control measures gather at the Legislative Office Building in Concord, N.H., in August, to urge Republican Gov. Chris Sununu to act after mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. Michael Casey/AP hide caption

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Michael Casey/AP

Guns collected in an effort to buy back firearms in Anaheim, Calif., in 2016. The police department obtained 676 guns and gave out $100 gift cards in exchange. The U.S. rate of deaths from gun violence, at 4.43 deaths per 100,000 people, it is four times higher than the rates in war-torn Syria and Yemen. Jeff Gritchen/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Gritchen/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images