CPSC CPSC
Stories About

CPSC

This April 17, 2018, file photo shows the Wayfair website on a computer in New York. More than a half a million beds sold at retailers like Walmart and Wayfair are under recall because they can break during use, which has resulted in dozens of injuries. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jenny Kane/AP

The Fisher-Price Infant-to-Toddler Rocker and Newborn-to-Toddler Rocker were tied to at least 13 deaths over a 12-year period. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

One of the Home Bed assist handles recalled by Drive DeVilbiss Healthcare. The company is recalling both its Bed Assist Handles and Bed Assist Rail after two deaths were reported. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Walmart is recalling about 3,900 bottles of Better Homes and Gardens-branded Essential Oil Infused Aromatherapy Room Spray with Gemstones in six different scents due to the possibility of a rare and dangerous bacteria discovered. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

toggle caption
Consumer Product Safety Commission

The Consumer Product Safety Commission has sued Amazon to pressure the retail giant to recall hundreds of thousands of potentially hazardous products. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Skull fractures, concussions and broken bones are common injuries when children not yet able to walk use infant walkers and fall down stairs. Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mint Images/Getty Images

The SawStop senses an electrical current in the hot dog. Courtesy of SawStop hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of SawStop

Despite Proven Technology, Attempts To Make Table Saws Safer Drag On

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542474093/542547036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Product safety field staff send damaged products, such as this burnt battery pack from a defective electric scooter, to the government testing lab in Rockville, Md. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

As Batteries Keep Catching Fire, U.S. Safety Agency Prepares For Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503132072/503632472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript