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genetic research

Results from a DNA sequencer used in the Human Genome Project. National Human Genome Research Institute hide caption

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National Human Genome Research Institute

'All of Us' research project diversifies the storehouse of genetic knowledge

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Why wolves are thriving in this radioactive zone

In 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, releasing radioactive material into northern Ukraine and Belarus. It was the most serious nuclear accident in history. Over one hundred thousand people were evacuated from the surrounding area. But local gray wolves never left — and their population has grown over the years. It's seven times denser than populations in protected lands elsewhere in Belarus. This fact has led scientists to wonder whether the wolves are genetically either resistant or resilient to cancer — or if the wolves are simply thriving because humans aren't interfering with them.

Why wolves are thriving in this radioactive zone

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New research probes the relationship between certain genes and brain disorders like autism and schizophrenia. Jill George / NIH hide caption

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Jill George / NIH

Brain cells, interrupted: How some genes may cause autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia

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On the left is an unmodified hatchling of a longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). The one on the right was injected with CRISPR-Cas9 targeting a pigmentation gene before the first cell division. It has very few pigmented cells and lighter eyes. Karen Crawford hide caption

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Karen Crawford

The 1st Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

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Researchers looked for genetic variants linked to sexual behavior in new genetic research that analyzed DNA from donated blood samples from nearly half a million middle-aged people from Britain who participated in a project called UK Biobank. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Search For 'Gay Genes' Comes Up Short In Large New Study

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Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Kamni Vallabh helps her daughter Sonia get ready for her wedding, a few months before Kamni started showing symptoms of the prion disease that would kill her. Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh

A Mother's Early Death Drives Her Daughter To Find A Treatment

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Rosemary Navarro, 40, looks through old childhood photographs at her home in La Habra, Calif. Her mother, Rosa Maria Navarro, passed away in 2009 from Alzheimer's. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Simone Biles flies through the air while performing on the balance beam at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

How A 'Sixth Sense' Helps Simone Biles Fly, And The Rest Of Us Walk

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Kalydeco is one of the first drugs that is effective at combating the root causes of a genetic disease. Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc. hide caption

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Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc.